See Dallas Police Department report of Mary Lawrence's observations.

PRESIDENT KENNEDY IS SHOT AND KILLED


This is Ruth Paine's home as seen from 5th St.  Jack Ruby band members Bill Willis and William Simmons
 lived in a house located just 200 feet west, on the opposite side of 5th St., where they could easily watch the Paine home.

HARVEY, WEARING A LONG-SLEEVED BROWN SHIRT, LEAVES DEALEY PLAZA



Reed's photo of McWaters' bus as it approached the School Book Depository.
Reed's second photo of McWaters' bus shows it stalled in traffic near the TSBD. 


THE ATTEMPTED MURDER OF HARVEY OSWALD

Some of the brightest minds in the CIA planned the assassination of President Kennedy. Top-level CIA officers like Angleton, Phillips, Hunt, Joannides, and others could easily put together a hit team based on the Operation 40 group. And they were very experienced in creating a smoke and mirrors propaganda campaign and an evidentiary paper trail that would be easy for investigators (Warren Commission) to follow and fall in line behind, with the intractable conclusion that Oswald killed the President. A tremendous amount of time, money, and effort was put into setting up HARVEY Oswald as the one and only “patsy” in the murder of President Kennedy. And these people could not afford to have their one and only suspect remain alive for very long-with the real fear that he might start singing like a canary to the police. The longer he was held in custody, the greater that risk became. They needed him dead as quickly as possible after he left the TSBD on 11/22/63. But HARVEY Oswald's destination, likely chosen by his handlers, was clearly the Texas Theater.

Following the assassination of President Kennedy, the killing of (HARVEY) Oswald was the number one priority for the planners. This posed a serious problem because the planners were not "on the ground" in Dallas to carry out their objective and had to depend on others. Their worst nightmare would be if HARVEY Oswald was arrested and began revealing details of his work as a spy, his false defection to the USSR, his true identity and place of birth, the CIA's "Oswald Project," his undercover work for the FBI, and his activities leading up to the assassination. If Oswald talked he could not only demonstrate his innocence, but implicate others, and the public would soon learn who was behind the coup d'etat that killed JFK. After JFK was killed, eliminating Oswald as quickly as possible became their most urgent priority. It appears the first attempt to kill HARVEY Oswald may have been on a Dallas city bus driven by Cecil McWatters. Bus passenger Roy Milton Jones told the FBI that shortly after a man (HARVEY Oswald) got off the bus, two police officers boarded the bus and searched passengers for weapons. This was before anyone knew that HARVEY Oswald had left the TSBD. Why did two police search that particular bus? Answer: They knew that HARVEY Oswald was supposed to be on that bus. Who were these police officers?

DALLAS POLICE CAPTAIN W.R. WESTBROOK

Captain W. R. Westbrook was in charge of personnel at Dallas Police headquarters. He had his own office, worked at a desk, and dressed in plainclothes. Westbrook's work, on a day to day basis, was more like a civilian than a police officer.  He told the WC, "At the present time I am personnel officer. We conduct all background investigations of applicants, both civilian and police, and then we make--we investigate all personnel complaints--not all of them, but the major ones." Around 12:31-32 PM one of the DPD dispatchers, Mrs. Kinney, came into Westbrook's office and told him shots had been fired at President Kennedy. Westbrook sent officers from his office, Sergeants Stringer and Carver, and possibly Joe Fields and McGee, to the TSBD building. But why did Westbrook send his officers DIRECTLY to the Texas School Book Depository building, when the earliest police dispatches reported gunshots from the grassy knoll area?

Westbrook told the WC that he then walked down the hall spreading the word and telling the other people that they needed some men down there (TSBD) and that almost everybody left (CIRCA 12:33-34 PM). Westbrook said that he "sat around" a while (TIME UNKNOWN--5 MINUTES?) and then began walking, in civilian clothes, one mile to the Texas Depository Building, a 22 minute walk. Westbrook said there wasn't a police car available to drive him, yet Capt. Westbrook could easily have asked the dispatcher to call a patrol car. Westbrook said that while walking to the TSBD he stopped along the way to listen to transistor radio reports. Westbrook told the WC, "After we [WE, PLURAL!] reached the building, I contacted my sergeant, Sgt. Stringer, and he was standing in front and so then I went into the building to help start the search [START THE SEARCH? THE SEARCH WAS ALREADY WELL UNDERWAY!] and I was on the first floor and I had walked down an aisle and opened a door onto an outside loading dock. And when I came out onto this dock, one of the men hollered and said there had been an officer killed in Oak Cliff [CIRCA 1:16-1:19 PM]." 

WESTBROOK'S WC TESTIMONY ASIDE, HIS WHEREABOUTS FROM THE TIME HE WAS SEEN AT THE POLICE STATION (CIRCA 12:33-12:40 PM) TO HIS ARRIVAL AT THE TSBD (CIRCA 1:10-1:15) ARE UNKNOWN. HIS STORY OF WALKING TO THE TSBD, AFTER THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES WAS SHOT, IS NEARLY IMPOSSIBLE TO BELIEVE. THERE IS NO PROOF THAT WESTBROOK WAS EVER IN THE TSBD. BUT THIS STORY GAVE WESTBROOK AN ALIBI TO ACCOUNT FOR 40-50 MINUTES OF HIS TIME. CAPTAIN WESTBROOK WOULD LIKE US TO BELIEVE THAT HE WALKED 22 MINUTES TO THE SCENE OF PRESIDENT KENNEDY'S MURDER, BUT THEN HURRIEDLY DROVE TO THE SCENE OF OFFICER TIPPIT'S MURDER.

RESERVE OFFICER SGT. KENNETH CROY

Kenneth Croy was a 26-year-old reserve police officer, separated from his wife, and living with his parents. Croy told the WC that when President Kennedy was shot he was sitting in his car at City Hall (same location as Capt. Westbrook). Croy said that while driving his car home he  was "hemmed in from both sides" by traffic on Main and Griffin for about 20 minutes. He drove past the courthouse on Elm and asked police officers (names unknown) if he could be of any assistance. Croy said that after the officers said "No" that he proceeded to drive home. Croy would have us believe that he was told by these officers that his services were not needed, when many off-duty police officers were called at home and told to report for duty.  And Croy testified that while at the courthouse his estranged wife "pulled up beside me," and the couple then decided to go to lunch together at Austin's Barbecue (yet Croy and his wife were separated).  But first, Croy said that he needed to change clothes at his parents' home. On the day of a President Kennedy's assassination Sergeant Croy would like us to believe that his priorities were to drive to his parents' house, change clothes, and have lunch with his estranged wife!!

CROY'S WC TESTIMONY ASIDE, HIS WHEREABOUTS FROM 12:30 PM UNTIL 1:10 PM ARE UNKNOWN. HIS STORY OF SITTING IN HIS CAR WHEN THE PRESIDENT WAS SHOT, AND GETTING HEMMED IN WITH TRAFFIC FOR 20 MINUTES GAVE HIM AN ALIBI TO ACCOUNT FOR NEARLY 3/4 OF AN HOUR OF HIS TIME. CROY WOULD LIKE US TO BELIEVE THAT ON THE DAY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES WAS KILLED, ONE OF THE MOST MEMORABLE DAYS OF THE CENTURY, HE DECIDED TO HAVE LUNCH WITH HIS ESTRANGED WIFE AND GO HOME.

THE FOLLOWING IS SPECULATION BY THE AUTHOR:  This author does not believe that Westbrook walked to the TSBD nor was in the TSBD. This author does not believe that Croy spoke with police officers in front of the court house, had lunch with his wife, and then went home. This author believes that Westbrook, accompanied by Sgt. Kenneth Croy, drove his unmarked dark blue police car to Dealey Plaza. Westbrook and Croy soon boarded McWatters' bus, looking for HARVEY Oswald, which was not reported to the WC nor investigated by the FBI or DPD (CIRCA 12:45-12:50). Capt. Westbrook may have been carrying a "drop gun" that could have been "planted" on Oswald if and when Oswald was shot and killed on the bus. If (HARVEY) Oswald had been killed on the bus, Stuart Reed's photos of McWatters' bus would have become famous. After failing to locate HARVEY Oswald on the bus, the author believes that Westbrook and Croy drove a police vehicle to Oak Cliff in an attempt to locate HARVEY Oswald (circa 12:55 PM). Were Westbrook and Croy the two police officers seen by Earlene Roberts, driving past 1026 N. Beckley, circa 1:01 PM? QUESTION: Capt Westbrook hired Roscoe White only two months before the assassination. Where was Roscoe White, and what was he doing on 11/22/63?



BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO THE PRE-ARRANGED MURDER OF OFFICER J.D.TIPPIT


BACK AT THE BOOK DEPOSITORY, LEE OSWALD LEAVES DEALEY PLAZA WEARING A WHITE T-SHIRT.

After shots were fired at President Kennedy, LEE Oswald walked through the office of the Book Depository and was seen by Mrs. Reid carrying a coke and wearing a white t-shirt.  He then left the building and may have been given a pistol by Jack Ruby, as witnessed by three women from the Dal-Tex Bldg. LEE Oswald then walked west on the Elm Street extension in front of the TSBD and waited. At 12:40 PM a light colored Nash Rambler station wagon, with a chrome luggage rack, pulled over to the curb and stopped. Deputy Sheriff Roger Craig heard a shrill whistle, which attracted his attention, and watched as a young man wearing a white t-shirt walked over to the car and got in. Craig identified the man as (LEE) Harvey Oswald. Marvin Robinson was driving his Cadillac directly behind the Nash Rambler when it suddenly stopped. Robinson saw a white male hurry over to the car and get in. Robinson's employee, Roy Cooper, was following him in a different vehicle and also saw the man hurry over and get into the car. Both men told the FBI the man who got into the Nash Rambler was (LEE) Harvey Oswald, but neither man was interviewed by the WC. Helen Forrest saw the same man run toward the Nash Rambler and get in. She said, "If it wasn't Oswald, it was his identical twin." Helen Forrest was never interviewed by the WC nor was her statement published in the WC volumes. The Nash Rambler was last seen driving under the triple overpass with LEE Oswald, who was wearing a white t-shirt.  Before meeting up with Officer Tippit near 10th & Patton, LEE Oswald acquired a pistol and a light colored medium-sized jacket that he wore over his white t-shirt.


NOTE: It is possible that the light colored jacket was retrieved by LEE Oswald either when he returned to his Oak Cliff apartment or from Ruby's apartment at 223 S. Ewing.

For a more detailed discussion of how Lee, and especially Harvey, left Dealey Plaza, click here.


LEE Oswald on East 10th St. in Oak Cliff

About 1:03 PM LEE Oswald was seen by several witnesses in the Oak Cliff suburb of Dallas walking west near the corner of 10th St. & Marsalis--more than a mile south of HARVEY Oswald's rooming house. LEE Oswald was only three blocks north of Jack Ruby's apartment (223 S. Ewing), where he had been seen the night before by Helen McIntosh, a guest of Ruby's next door neighbor. Four blocks from Ruby's apartment, and only one block east of 10th & Patton, was a small, single story house at 511 E. 10th that was owned by attorney Dick Loomis, Sr., and his wife. Mrs. Loomis was a housewife and President of the Oak Cliff Fine Arts Club. She told FBI agents Griffin and Carter that a young couple, who were identical to LEE Harvey and Marina Oswald, lived next door in an apartment complex at 507 E. 10th (13 apartments) about one week before the assassination. Mrs. Loomis saw Marina and her infant child in front of her home and recalled that Marina had jet black hair (at this time Marina had two children). She said Marina wore very plain clothing and on one occasion wore a light blouse and plaid skirt and on another occasion a dark blouse and the same plaid skirt. She once saw a heavy-set man visit the apartment next door and thought it may have been Ruby. FBI agent James Hosty, who never met Oswald face-to-face prior to November 22, 1963, told fellow FBI agent Carver Gayton that he left notes under Oswald's apartment door. But the Warren Commission reported that Oswald lived either at his rooming house (1026 N. Beckley) or at Ruth Paine's house in Irving, TX, neither of which was an apartment. Hosty did not leave notes at Oswald's rooming house or at Ruth Paine's, but he could have left notes under the door at several of LEE Oswald's previous apartments, including 507 E. 10th, 1106 Diceman Avenue, or an apartment in Oak Lawn that Ruby rented for Oswald (according to DPD informant T-1).

Mr. Clark worked as a barber at the 10th Street Barber Shop, 620 E. 10th, two blocks north of Jack Ruby's apartment. Mr. Clark may have been the first person to see LEE Oswald walking west on 10th Street, four blocks east of 10th & Patton. FBI agent Carl Underhill reported, "On the morning of 11/22/63 (no time specified) Clark had seen a man whom he would bet his life on was Oswald passing the shop in a great hurry and had commented on same to a customer in the chair." Lee Oswald walked past the Town and Country Cafe at 604 E l0th, crossed Marsalis Avenue, and continued walking west on l0th. William Lawrence "Red" Smith, working on a project one block east of 10th & Patton, began walking east toward the Town and Country Cafe (604 E 10th) for lunch shortly after 1:00 PM. Smith said that he, "felt sure that the man who walked by him going west on 10th St. was LEE Harvey Oswald" (interview of Smith by SA Brookhart 1/13/64).  Tile workers James W. Archer and Jimmy Brewer were sitting in Archer's pick-up truck on the southeast corner of 10th & Denver. Brewer saw the same man walking west on 10th St. Jimmy Burt, 505 E. 10th, was across the street from the construction site where Smith was working and watched the same man as he continued walking west. Burt described the man (LEE Oswald) as a white male, approximately 5'8", wearing a light short jacket (interview of Burt by SA Christianson and Acklin 12/16/63). Burt said that he "caught a glimpse" of the shooter but "was never closer than 50-60 yards" to this man. William Arthur Smith was with Burt at the time and described the same man as "a white male, about 5'7" to 5'8", 20 to 25 years of age, 150-160, wearing a white shirt, light brown jacket and dark pants (interview of Smith by SA Ward and Basham 12/13/63). Smith told the Warren Commission that the man who shot Tippit was too far away to positively identify him. Both Burt and Smith watched this unknown man as he continued walking west on 10th St, toward Patton. They saw a black police squad car driving east and slowly pull over to the curb. The young man casually walked over to the squad car and begin speaking with the officer through the passenger window (circa 1:06 PM). After the assassination, Burt and Smith were shown (HARVEY) Oswald's photograph and both men said this was not the man who shot Tippit.







Taxi driver William Scoggins was sitting in his taxi at the corner of 10th & Patton eating his lunch, as a police car passed by driving east. Scoggins recognized the driver and told the Warren Commission "just used to see him (Tippit) every day." As Tippit stopped, and parked his vehicle in front of the small driveway at 410 E. 10th, Scoggins saw a young man walking west (toward Scoggins) on 10th St., and watched the man approach the police car. Scoggins told the Warren Commission the young man was wearing a light colored jacket, a white shirt, and dark trousers.

As LEE Oswald (white shirt) began talking with Tippit (in front of 404 E. 10th), he was carrying a concealed weapon, a .38 revolver. "HARVEY Oswald" (brown shirt) was .7 mile west, inside of the Texas Theater, and was also carrying a concealed weapon--a .38 revolver (click here to see YouTube interview with Burroughs). HARVEY Oswald arrived at the theater at 1:07-08 PM, and almost certainly purchased a ticket from Julia Postal. Jones Harris, a long time assassination investigator, arrived in Dallas the day after the assassination. Harris interviewed Julia Postal in the office of the manager of the Texas Theater. Harris asked Postal if she sold a ticket to the man arrested in the theater by the Dallas Police. Postal immediately burst into tears. Harris walked out of the office and returned a short time later. When Harris asked Postal again if she sold (HARVEY) Oswald a ticket she again burst into tears. Harris was convinced that Postal knew that she sold Harvey Oswald a ticket to the theater. Butch Burroughs told Texas researcher Jim Marrs that Postal knows that she sold (HARVEY) Oswald a ticket.  Burroughs was the "ticket-taker" inside of the theater, and sold HARVEY Oswald popcorn a few minutes after he arrived. If HARVEY Oswald had not purchased a ticket, Burroughs would have known.

HARVEY Oswald purchased popcorn from Burroughs about 1:15 PM, and then returned to the lower level and took a seat next to a pregnant woman. Within a few minutes both Oswald and the woman got up from their seats. HARVEY Oswald walked into the concession area and then back into the lower level and took a seat next to Jack Davis in the first row on the right side. Davis remembered that Oswald was sitting next to him, in the near empty theater, as the opening credits to the movie began (a few minutes before 1:20 PM). After sitting next to Davis for a few minutes, Oswald got up and walked past empty seats to the small aisle on the right side of the theater and into the concession area. Davis watched (HARVEY) Oswald as he again re-entered the theater and took a seat next to a man on the back row, directly across the aisle from Davis. Within a few minutes HARVEY Oswald got up and once again returned to the concession area. He returned a few minutes later and took a seat across the aisle from Mr. Davis, and then moved to another seat on the fourth row. It appeared to Davis as though (HARVEY) Oswald was looking for someone, perhaps a contact.

NOTE: After his arrest, the police found two halves of two different dollar bills in his wallet (see below). This was a method of clandestine contact. Wherever and whenever Oswald met his contact, this person would provide confirmation of his identity with the other half of these dollar bills. Curiously, neither of these items were listed on the police inventory of 11/23/63, the joint FBI/DPD inventory of 11/26/63 (Oswald's so-called possessions), nor were they photographed. At the National Archives, in Adelphi, MD, I inspected and handled each item of inventory listed on the joint FBI/DPD inventory of 11/26/63. These items were not among the inventory.


Butch Burroughs saw HARVEY Oswald sitting next to one person-- a pregnant lady, and both got up from their seats only minutes apart. (Why would a pregnant woman watch a war movie at 1:15 PM on a Friday afternoon? How likely is that? And why and how did this pregnant woman leave the theater just before the police arrived?)  Burroughs remembered that prior to the police arriving this pregnant lady went to the restroom in the balcony and he never saw her again. Could this woman have been HARVEY's  contact at the theater? Perhaps, but what was her purpose or her assignment? Could her assignment have been to simply walk past Hardy's Shoe Store, in order to alert Johnny Brewer that HARVEY Oswald was in the theater?

LEE Oswald and Officer Tippit have a friendly conversation

Officer Tippit lived with his wife and family at 238 Glencairn, 7 miles south of 10th & Patton, and he patrolled area 78 in South Oak Cliff. On November 22 (circa 12:35 PM to 1:10 PM) Tippit was in the area of central Oak Cliff (patrol district 91--assigned to Officer William Mentzel), several miles from his assigned district. Curiously, several of the people who witnessed the shooting of Officer Tippit near 10th & Patton either knew him or were familiar with him, even though he was many miles from his assigned patrol area. Witness Jimmy Burt recognized Tippit "as an officer who frequented the neighborhood." Burt said, "This particular officer was known by the name 'Friendly' to the residents of that area." Witness William Scoggins (taxi driver) said, "I wasn't paying too much attention to the man, you see, just used to see him every day." Witness Aquila Clemmons told researcher Mark Lane that she saw Tippit "all the time." Why was Tippit known to residents living near 10th & Patton, when his assigned patrol district was miles away?

400 E. 10th St.…..404 E. 10th St…...410 E. 10th St.

Tippit's familiarity to local residents could be understood by the WC testimony of Virginia Davis, who lived in the house next door (400 E. 10th) to where Tippit was shot and killed (404 E. 10th). Davis was asked by Commission attorney David Belin "Where was the police car parked?" Davis answered, "It was parked between the hedge that marks the apartment house where he (Tippit) lives in (410 E. 10th) and the house next door (404 E. 10th)." According to Virginia Davis' testimony, Officer Tippit was living in the house at 410 E. 10th. If Tippit lived in this house (actually a duplex apartment--410/408 E. 10th), or was having an affair with a woman living in this house (Johnny Maxie Thompson), this would explain not only his familiarity with local residents, but could also explain a familiar location where he could meet up with LEE Oswald and fellow co-conspirators. LEE Oswald meeting Tippit at this precise location, and at this precise time, was not an accident--their meeting was pre-planned.

While HARVEY Oswald (brown shirt) was sitting in the darkened Texas Theater, with a loaded .38 revolver, Tippit was driving west on 10th St. Witnesses in the 500 block of East 10th saw the shooter walking west toward 10th & Patton. But witnesses Helen Markham, standing on the corner at 10th & Patton, told the Warren Commission that the shooter was walking the same direction as the police car was driving--east. LEE Oswald could have walked past 410 E. 10th and, when he did not see Tippit's police vehicle, may have continued walking west. When he saw Tippit's police car in the distance he then turned around, and walked back to the address where Tippit frequented. Tippit slowly drove his police car to the curb and stopped directly in front of the narrow driveway at 404 E. 10th. This driveway, between the houses at 404 and 410 E. 10th, led from 10th St to the alley behind the houses (see map). Tippit may have intentionally parked his car directly in front of this narrow driveway. If a vehicle turned onto this narrow driveway from the alley, Tippit would have seen the approaching car immediately.

LEE Oswald (white shirt/white jacket) casually approached the police car and began talking with Tippit thru the passenger side car window. It appears that Tippit and LEE Oswald were talking quietly, passing the time, while waiting for someone to arrive. Jack Roy Tatum was driving east on 10th St. in his new, red, Ford Fairlane. As he approached the squad car Tatum noticed a young white male with both hands in the pockets of his zippered jacket leaning over the passenger side window of the squad car. Tatum said, "It looked as if Oswald and Tippit were talking to each other.... It was almost as if Tippit knew Oswald." Of course they knew each other. LEE Oswald was the same man that Tippit sat next to at the Dobbs Restaurant two days earlier (Wednesday, Nov 20), while HARVEY was working at the TSBD. Tatum said, "he had on a light colored zipper jacket, dark trousers and what looked like a t-shirt on." Tatum later told HSCA investigator Moriarty that he did not see (LEE) Oswald wearing a brown shirt, just a white t-shirt. HARVEY Oswald was sitting in the Texas Theater wearing a long sleeve, dark brown shirt.


A 2nd police vehicle arrives

Within a few minutes a 2nd police vehicle emerged from the alley and began driving slowly on the narrow driveway toward Tippit's car. The second police car was seen by Mrs. Holan, who lived directly across the street from where Tippet's patrol car was parked. As the second police car stopped between the two houses (404 E. 10th & 410 E. 10th), LEE Oswald stood up and backed away from Tippits patrol car. Officer Tippet got out of his car and began walking around the front of his car toward the 2nd police car, probably expecting to meet the officers in the police car. Unknown to Tippit, he had only seconds to live.



As Tippit walked near the front of his patrol car LEE Oswald pulled his pistol and fired three shots. After Tippit fell to the ground LEE Oswald walked to the back of Tippit's car. He then stopped, returned to where Tippit was laying, and and deliberately shot him in the head (around 1:06-1:08 PM). Could Westbrook, who got out of the police car at the same time, have said, "finish the job," or something similar? That could have caused LEE Oswald to stop, turn around and re-trace his steps, and then shoot Tippit in the head with a fourth shot.  Jack Tatum saw the 4th shot and said, "whoever shot Tippit was determined that he shouldn't live and he was determined to finish the job."

NOTE: JFK researcher Shirley Martin tape-recorded an interview with Mrs. Aquilla Clemmons in August, 1964. Mrs. Clemmons said that while sitting on her porch, she saw two men standing near the police cruiser moments before Tippit was shot.

Mrs. Doris Holan lived on the 2nd floor at 409 E Tenth Street (see map above), directly across the street from the Tippit shooting. Mrs Holan had just returned home from her job a few minutes after 1:00 PM when she heard several gun shots. From her 2nd floor bedroom window she had possibly the best view of the murder scene (see photo), and saw Tippit lying on the street near the left front of his patrol car. Mrs. Holan observed the shooter as he was walking across the Davis's lawn toward Patton. Mrs Holan also noticed a 2nd police car parked in the narrow driveway between the houses directly across the street (between 404 and 410 E. 10th). Tippit's car was parked on 10th St., directly in front of the narrow driveway, and prevented the 2nd police car from driving onto 10th St.

NOTEThe 2nd police car drove on a narrow alleyway between Jefferson Blvd. and 10th St. (see map), and then turned onto the small, narrow driveway between two houses (404 E. 10th & 410 E. 10th). This police vehicle then parked/stopped on the narrow driveway between the two houses, where it could not be seen by most witnesses to the shooting (Clemmons, Burt, Smith, Wright, Virginia Davis, Barbara Davis). However, Mrs Holan did see the 2nd police vehicle and both she and Aquilla Clemmons saw two men at the scene of the shooting, and one of those men came from the 2nd police vehicle. The location of the 2nd police vehicle, parked between the two houses on a very narrow driveway, was no accident. The precise location of this vehicle, and the precise timing of it's arrival, is the best indication that Tippit's murder was pre-planned and involved both LEE Oswald the occupants of the 2nd police vehicle.



Building identification and labels courtesy of David Josephs


Seconds after shots were fired, Mrs. Holan saw a man (probably Capt. Westbrook) emerge from the 2nd police car and walk toward Tippit's body lying in the street, apparently to see if he (Tippit) was alive or dead.  In 1990 a resident of the neighborhood was interviewed by JFK researcher Prof. Bill Pulte, on the condition of anonymity. This resident said that he heard that a man walked down the driveway and approached Tippit just after the shooting.  In January, 1968, Playboy Magazine interviewed Jim Garrison. In response to the Garrison interview a reader wrote to Playboy and said, “I read Playboy's Garrison interview with perhaps more interest than most readers. I was an eyewitness to the shooting of policeman Tippit in Dallas on the afternoon President Kennedy was murdered. I saw two men, neither of them resembling the pictures I later saw of Lee Harvey Oswald, shoot Tippit and run off in opposite directions. There were at least half a dozen other people who witnessed this. My wife convinced me that I should say nothing, since there were other eyewitnesses. Her advice and my cowardice undoubtedly have prolonged my life-or at least allowed me now to tell the true story...” (Playboy, January 1968, Vol. 15, No 1, pg 11. Mrs. Acquilla Clemmons (interview August, 1964) said that after the shooting she saw the killer wave to the other man and they departed the scene in two different directions. This is a clear indication that the killer (LEE Oswald) and the occupants of the 2nd police vehicle were co-conspirators in the murder of Officer Tippit.

From her 2nd floor bedroom Mrs. Holan hurried downstairs to the 1st floor and outside the house. She watched the man standing beside Tippit as he began to retrace his path up the driveway while the 2nd police car backed up to the alley. The 2nd police vehicle quickly and quietly left before witnesses began to arrive at the scene. Sam Guinyard, who worked at the Harris Motor Company, directly south and across the alley from Virginia and Barbara Davis' home (400 E. 10th), apparently saw the 2nd police car. In 1970 Guinyard told JFK researcher Michael Brownlow that he saw a police car in the alley shortly after Tippit was shot.  After the shooting the second occupant of the police car, Sgt. Kenneth Croy, remained at 10th & Patton and was seen moments later by Virginia Davis. Capt. Westbrook quickly left the scene, briefly met up with LEE Oswald, and then drove the police vehicle back to the TSBD and arrived around 1:15 PM. Westbrook and Croy, occupants of the 2nd police car, were co-conspirators whose involvement and manipulation of evidence will be further explained.


Tippit's car parked in front of driveway
between 404 and 410 E. 10th
Home of the Davis Sisters,
400 E. 10th



Mrs. Holan's home at 409 E. 10th
Mrs. Holans view of the Tippit murder scen


Mr. Ball. Where was he when you saw him emptying his gun?
Mrs. Davis. He was right here on the other side of this bush.
Mr. Ball. Did you later look in the bushes and find something?
Mrs. Davis. Yes; in the grass beside the house.
Mr. Ball. The grass beside the house. What did you find?
Mrs. Davis. We found one shell.
Mr. Ball. And your sister-in-law, did your sister-in-law find something else?
Mrs. Davis. She found one later in the afternoon. 
Mrs. Davis. We saw the boy cutting across the street.
Mr. Belin. Then what did you do or see?
Mrs. Davis. After he disappeared around the corner we ran out in the front yard and down to see what had happened.
Mr. Belin. Then is that when you saw the policeman?
Mrs. Davis. I saw the policeman lying on the street.
Mr. Belin. All right. Did you see or do anything else? Did you see anyone else that you know come up to the policeman?
Mrs. Davis. No sir; there was a lot of people around there.
Mr. Belin. Do you remember about what time of day this was?
Mrs. Davis. I wouldn't say for sure. But it was about 1:30, between 1:30 and 2.
Mr. Belin. All right, after this, did police come out there?
Mrs. Davis. Yes; they was already there.
Mr. Belin. By the time you got out there?
Mrs. Davis. Yes, sir.
Mr. Belin. Then what did you do?
Mrs. Davis. Well, we just stood out there and watched. You know, tried to see how it all happened. But we saw part of it.
Mr. Belin. Then what did you do?
Mrs. Davis. We stood out there until after the ambulance had come and picked him up.
T.F. Bowley, driving west on 10th Street, did not see the shooting. He arrived at the scene and used the police radio to report the shooting. Bowley looked at his watch--the time was 1:10 PM (CE 2003). An original DPD police transcript, found in the National Archives, lists the time of transmission as 1:10 PM. The police were quickly notified of the shooting by telephone (Mrs. Higgins; Barbara Davis), Scoggin's dispatcher, and by Bowley using Tippit's car radio. The police dispatcher broadcast the shooting at 1:10 PM as witnesses (Markham, W.A. Smith, Scoggins, Virginia Davis, Barbara Davis, Callaway, Benavides, Wright) began to walk to Tippit's patrol car and saw him lying on the street. An ambulance was dispatched from the Dudley Hughes Funeral Home (one block south on Jefferson) and quickly arrived at 10th & Patton.

RESERVE OFFICER SGT. KENNETH CROY

Croy told the WC that he was driving his car in downtown Dallas when he heard about the shooting of the President over his police radio. Minutes after the shooting, while driving past the court house, Croy saw police officers and asked if they needed any help. According to Croy, these officers said "no." Croy then said his wife (estranged) pulled up beside him driving her car and asked if he wanted to get something to eat. They agreed to meet at Austin's Bar-B-Que in Oak Cliff. This was Sgt. Croy's testimony, but it makes no sense. Croy was unable to identify the police officers who were standing in front of the court house. Croy said nothing about the large crowds in and around the court house, less than a block from the TSBD, on the most infamous day in Dallas history. Why would police officers decline Croy's offer to help, when off-duty police were being called at home and asked to return to duty? Why would Croy and his estranged wife allegedly agree to meet for lunch, only a few minutes after the President of the United States had been shot. Croy's testimony makes no sense, but it does give him an alibi that helps to mask and keep secret his activities and involvement with the murder of officer Tippit.

RESERVE OFFICER CROY AT THE TIPPIT MURDER SCENE

Croy told the Warren Commission that while driving on Zang Blvd., he heard about the Tippit shooting over the police radio. Croy said that he was the first police officer to arrive at the scene of Tippit's murder. After arriving at the scene he saw Tippit being loaded in the ambulance. However, witness Virginia Davis said a police officer (probably Sgt. Croy) was there just after the shooter (LEE Oswald) threw empty shells on the ground and ran south on Patton. Croy said that he then stood next to Tippit's car and interviewed a witness for about 10 minutes, but could not remember her name. In fact Croy could not remember the name of a single witness nor could he remember the name of any police officer.

Mr. Griffin.  Were you at the scene when Tippit was there?
Mr. Croy.  Yes.
Mr. Griffin.  Unassigned.
Mr. Croy.  Yes.

Mr. Griffin. I see. Now, I am just referring to the street you found him on. When you got there, was Tippit's car there?
Mr. Croy. Yes.
Mr. Griffin. Was Tippit there?
Mr. Croy. They were loading him in the ambulance.
Mr. Griffin. Were other officers on the scene?
Mr. Croy. None that I saw.

Mr. Griffin. Did any of the--how many police officers came out to the scene of the Tippit killing while you were there?
Mr. Croy. I don't know. There was a slew of them. That would be hard to say.
Mr. Griffin. Were there any officers there that you knew?
Mr. Croy. There were several officers there that I knew. I don't know their names.

Mr. Croy. It was a woman standing across the street from me. I don't recall her name. She gave me her name at that time.
Mr. Griffin. How long did you talk with her?
Mr. Croy. Oh, a good 5 or 10 minutes.
Mr. Griffin. This conversation all took place near the scene of the Tippit killing?
Mr. Croy. Leaning up against his car.
Mr. Griffin. Do you know the name of the woman you talked to across the street?
Mr. Croy. I don't recall. I think she lived across the street. She was standing out in front watering her yard or doing something in her yard.
Mr. Griffin. Well, you stated that she was watering her yard?
Mr. Croy. Or something. She was standing in the yard doing something.
Mr. Griffin. But the first thing you indicated was, she had been watering her yard? Apparently that was something that stuck with you from, of course, talking with her?
Mr. Croy. I don't remember what she said she was doing. She was doing something in the yard, and I presume that is where she lived was across the street.

How convenient that Croy just happened to be the first officer at the scene of the Tippit shooting--some 10 minutes before any other police officers arrived. Croy's presence at 10th & Patton is best explained by the arrival of the 2nd police car seen by Mrs. Holan. Not a single police officer talked about Croy's presence at 10th and Patton.

NOTE: Croy testified before the WC. However, most of their questions related to Croy's presence and activities in the basement of the Dallas Police station when HARVEY Oswald was shot and killed by Jack Ruby. In the author's opinion, it was likely Croy who helped Ruby gain entrance to the basement so that he could kill Oswald.

Summary of Sgt. Kenneth Croy and Capt. W.R. Westbrook (SPECULATION by the author)


It is very possible, and likely, that Croy was in the 2nd police vehicle parked between the two houses (404 and 410 E. 10th) that was seen by Mrs. Holan. It is very possible, and likely, that Dallas Police Capt. W.R. Westbrook, wearing plain clothes, was the man who got out of the police vehicle and walked over to Tippit in order to confirm that Tippit was dead. Capt. Westbrook returned to the police vehicle, and backed up to the alley, while reserve officer Croy remained at the scene. After watching LEE Oswald hurry across their lawn Virginia Davis and her sister in law left their home and stood beside Tippit, while Sgt. Croy was "already there."  As the police vehicle backed up the narrow driveway and into the alley it was seen by Sam Guinyard, who worked for Harris Motor Company across the alley from the Davis' home. Westbrook likely drove the 2nd police vehicle a half block south to Jefferson Blvd., and then turned right toward the Texas Theater (only 5 blocks west). Westbrook likely met and/or picked up LEE Oswald near the Texaco station and may have driven him to the Texas Theater. Capt. Westbrook meeting LEE Oswald within minutes of the Tippit shooting would explain Westbrook's possession of three very important items given to him by LEE Oswald--a light-colored, medium size Eisenhower-type jacket (supposedly found later by Westbrook and officer John Mackey under a car at the Texaco Station), the 2nd Oswald wallet which Westbrook soon produced at the Tippit murder scene (allegedly given to Westbrook by Croy), and the .38 revolver that LEE Oswald used to shoot and kill Tippit. Following the shooting of Tippit, Westbrook drove his unmarked police car to the TSBD and waited for the police dispatcher to broadcast information about the shooting.

TIPPIT'S BODY IS REMOVED

As Sgt. Croy looked on, Tippit's body was loaded into the ambulance (circa 1:11-1:12 PM) by Clayton Butler and Eddie Kinsley and driven to nearby Methodist Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Liquori (circa 1:15 PM). Among the items removed from Tippit at the hospital and taken to the police station was one "black billfold."

At 1:22 PM, DPD officer J.M. Poe arrived and said, "there were already 150 to 200 people around there and the ambulance had already left." Benavides gave two empty shell casings, in an empty cigarette package, to Poe. We must wonder why Benavides did not give the two shell casings to Croy, if Croy was the first police officer at the scene. Helen Markham provided Poe with a description of the shooter (Markham never said she talked to Croy) which he immediately passed onto the DPD dispatcher who reported: "Last seen about the 300 block East Jefferson. He's a white male about 30, 5'8", black hair, slender, wearing a white jacket, white shirt and dark slacks."

DPD officers began to question witnesses as more and more on-lookers gathered. We will soon learn that a wallet containing identification for Lee Harvey Oswald and Alex Hidell was allegedly found at the Tippit murder scene by Croy, who claims that he gave the wallet to Capt. Westbrook.  But not one witness, not one ambulance driver, not one neighbor, not one on-looker and not one trained police officer saw a wallet lying on the street or in Tippit's car. One of the first witnesses at the murder scene was Ted Calloway, who said, "I'll tell you one thing, there was no billfold at that scene. If there was, there would have been too many people who would have seen it."

NOTE:  We can now understand that Croy's testimony about asking police officers if they needed assistance in Dealey Plaza shortly after the President was shot was nonsense. Croy's WC testimony about meeting his estranged wife for lunch at Austin's Bar B Que, and Croy's hearing about the Tippit shooting over his police radio are also nonsense. Croy was not driving his car near 10th & Patton when he heard about the Tippit shooting. Croy likely arrived at 10th & Patton with Capt. Westbrook in the police car seen by Mrs. Holan. He remained at the scene of the crime after Westbrook left in the police car, and was the officer seen by Virginia Davis after she walked from her porch to Tippit's police car. By claiming that he was the first and only officer on the scene, Croy could claim that he found, or was given, a wallet at the murder scene, before witnesses arrived (circa 1:10-1:12 PM). Croy should have been asked why he didn't give the wallet to any of two dozen regular police officers and detectives who arrived at the scene. Croy should have been asked why he held onto the wallet for 1/2 hour before giving the wallet to Westbrook, who did not arrive at the scene until 1:40 PM. In the authors opinion, Croy never saw the wallet nor had the wallet in his possession at any time.


WAS TIPPIT SHOT WITH A .38 REVOLVER OR A SEMI-AUTOMATIC PISTOL?

After talking with witness Ted Callaway Patrolman H.W. Summers reported that he had an "eyeball witness to the getaway man." The suspect was described as having black wavy hair, wearing an Eisenhower jacket of light color, with dark trousers and a white shirt. He was "apparently armed with a .32, dark finish, automatic pistol," which he had in his right hand. However, if an automatic pistol was used to kill Tippit, three of the spent shell casings would have been ejected at the point where Oswald began shooting Tippit and would have landed on 10th St. (near the passenger side of Tippit's squad car). After Oswald shot Tippit in the head, at point blank range, the last shell casing would have been ejected onto the pavement on 10th St., which it was not. Barbara and Virginia Davis watched Oswald as he crossed in front of their house and crossed their lawn, using his right hand to shake empty shells from an open revolver into his left hand. Two shell casings were recovered near a bush in the Davis' side yard on 10th St., about 50-60 ft. from the front of Tippit's squad car where the shots were fired.




A semi-automatic pistol would have ejected
shell casings onto 10th St.

Two .38 shell casings were recovered near the bush
at the right side of the porch.



LEE OSWALD ARRIVES AT THE TEXAS THEATER

It is obvious to this author that LEE Oswald's pre-arranged assignment was to kill Officer Tippit (which he did by intentionally shooting him in the head), and then lead police to the Texas Theater where HARVEY Oswald was sitting in the darkened theater with a loaded .38 revolver. Tippit's murder would soon be blamed on HARVEY Oswald, based upon identification found in a wallet that suddenly appeared in the hands of Capt. Westbrook at 10th & Patton. Identifying HARVEY Oswald as the killer of Officer Tippit would give Dallas Police ample justification to shoot HARVEY Oswald on site, especially if he was carrying a loaded revolver (perhaps with a defective firing pin). But I always wondered about two issues.   

1) How could the conspirators be absolutely sure that employees of the Texas Theater and the police would respond immediately to a young man who simply snuck into a movie theater, when their focus of attention was on the assassination of President Kennedy, the shooting of Texas Governor John Connally, and the murder of a DPD officer. Why would the police care about a person who snuck into a theater without buying a $.90 ticket? The conspirators needed to make absolutely sure that the police would be called, and that they would arrive at the theater.

NOTE: It was Johnny Brewer who raised such a commotion about a "suspicious man" sneaking into the theater that theater cashier Julia Postal finally called the police at 1:44 PM. But Julia was not the only person who called the police. JFK researcher Leo Sauvage asked Dallas Assistant District Attorney Jim Bowie whether a telephone call (by Julia Postal) had led to Oswald's arrest. Bowie told him there was a call from the cashier, but also that there were “Half a dozen calls!” Someone wanted to make sure the police would respond to a suspicious person hiding inside the Texas Theater.

2) The more important issue is that Tippit was shot at 1:06-1:08 PM, and it is only an 8-9 minute walk to the Texas Theater. Why were the police not called until 1:44 PM. What happened happened during that time (nearly 40 minutes) always bothered me, and has been on my mind for more than 20 years.


NOTE:
I was not the first to wonder about these missing minutes. In 1964 Wesley Liebeler wrote the following memo (JFK Exhibit No. 36--memo re. galley proofs of Chapter IV of the Report, Sept 6, 1964): "At first I was surprised to learn that Johnny Calvin Brewer knew that a patrolman had been shot when Oswald walked by his place of business, less than eight blocks from the point of the Tippet killing which Oswald apparently left as fast as he could. Then I was surprised to learn that the police radio did not send out information about the suspect being in the Texas Theater until 1:45, about 30 minutes after the police first learned of the Tippit killing from Benavides over Tippit's radio. What were Oswald and Brewer doing during this 30 minutes? Oswald was strangely inactive during this period, considering all that he had done the 45 minutes following the assassination."

The author believes that after killing Tippit LEE Oswald met up with Capt. Westbrook and gave him his jacket, his wallet, and his .38 revolver. LEE Oswald, when he entered the theater, was now wearing a white t-shirt and dark trousers (not a dark, long-sleeve shirt as reported by Johnny Brewer). LEE Oswald should have arrived at the Texas Theater 8-9 minutes after shooting Tippit (around 1:20 PM).


NOTE:
Less than 10 minutes after Tippit was shot and killed the author believes that Capt. Westbrook had possession of three very important items of evidence, given to him by the suspect--LEE Oswald's jacket, LEE Oswald's wallet, and the .38 revolver used to kill Tippit. This author believes the suspect (LEE Oswald) gave these items to Capt. Westbrook (who was present when LEE Oswald shot Tippit) prior to arriving at the Texas Theater. We will soon learn that Westbrook did everything he could to distance himself from the jacket. We will also learn the wallet produced by Westbrook and shown to officers at 10th & Patton disappeared. LEE Oswald also gave the .38 revolver that he used to murder officer Tippit to Westbrook (LEE Oswald could not take any of these items into the theater fearing that, if he was still there when the police arrived, he would be searched).

If Johnny Brewer had followed LEE Oswald, wearing a white t-shirt and dark trousers, from his shoe store to the theater, as he claimed, then Julia Postal would have called the police around 1:20-1:25 PM and the police would have arrived within a few minutes (as they did after being notified by Julia Postal at 1:44 PM). But I don't believe Johnny Brewer's story. I don't believe Brewer saw either HARVEY Oswald or LEE Oswald walk past his store on Jefferson Blvd.

The author believes that LEE Oswald, wearing a white t-shirt and dark trousers, walked to the theater after killing Tippit and arrived around 1:20 PM. LEE Oswald had just shot and killed a Dallas policeman. He certainly didn't want to attract attention by sneaking into a movie theater. So he bought a $.90 ticket from Julia Postal (as did HARVEY Oswald around 1:07 PM), walked into the theater and up the stairs into the balcony. The missing 25 minutes begins at 1:20 PM.

At 1:22 PM  the police dispatcher reported,  "white male, 30, about 5'8", slender, black hair, wearing shirt, a white jacket,  and dark slacks."  If a Dallas radio station broadcast a description of the suspect at 1:30 PM, their only source of information was police radio broadcasts. The police reported that Tippit's killer was 5'8", black hair, white shirt, white jacket,  dark slacks.  But Johnny Brewer told Julia Postal and the WC that the man he saw sneak into the theater was wearing a  long-sleeved dark brown shirt--not a white shirt and not a light colored jacket as reported by the police.  Brewer also said that this man was acting suspicious and appeared to be scared outside of his shoe store around 1:30 PM. Brewer's description of Oswald's clothing did not match the police broadcast. Brewers description of Oswald acting scared did not match police observations of HARVEY Oswald after he was arrested. Police officers said Oswald was calm and showed no signs of being scared. This author believes the "missing 25 minutes" are the result of Brewer needing to wait to hear about the murder of a policeman on the radio. After hearing a description of the suspect Brewer could then approach Julia Postal, tell her that a suspicious man had snuck into the theater, and insist that she call the police. BREWER NEVER EXPLAINED HOW HE WAS ABLE TO IDENTIFY THE SUSPECT, WEARING A WHITE SHIRT AND A WHITE JACKET ACCORDING TO THE RADIO, AS THE SAME MAN WHO APPEARED IN FRONT OF HIS STORE WEARING A DARK BROWN, LONG SLEEVE SHIRT. AND, ACCORDING TO DALLAS RADIO STATIONS, INFORMATION ABOUT THE TIPPIT SHOOTING WAS FIRST BROADCAST AT 1:51 PM, LONG AFTER BREWER CLAIMED TO HAVE HEARD IT ON THE RADIO.

Five radio stations covered the Dallas area on 11/22/63, and all routinely monitored the Dallas police radio. Four of these stations did not broadcast the Tippit shooting nor its location until after Oswald's arrest at 1:51 PM.

WBAP reported the Tippit shooting after Oswald's arrest at 1:51 PM.

KRLD reported the Tippit shooting after Oswald's arrest at 1:51 PM.

WFAA reported the Tippit shooting after Oswald's arrest at 1:51 PM (their archived recordings began at 1:47 PM, but did not cover the entire assassination period).

KLIF broadcast the Tippit shooting at 2:02 PM.     

KBOX was the only radio station that may have reported the Tippit shooting prior to Oswald's arrest, but this has never been proven. KBOX has archived radio broadcast recordings from 11/22/63 which begin at 1:35 PM, but information about the Tippit shooting begins only after Oswald's arrest at 1:51 PM. At 1:59 PM newsman Sam Pate repeated information that had supposedly been previously reported on KBOX about the Tippit shooting. If true (there are no archived recordings), this information would have to have been broadcast prior to the beginning of the KBOX archived radio recording at 1:35 PM.


At 1:35 PM Julia Postal was listening to KLIF radio and heard the official announcement that President Kennedy was dead. Julia said that Johnny Brewer appeared shortly after she heard the news of President Kennedy's death (circa 1:36 PM). Brewer asked Julia if she had sold a ticket to a man who was wearing a brown shirt  and she replied, "What man?" (How would Johnny Brewer know about a man wearing a long sleeve dark brown shirt (HARVEY Oswald), when that man had been sitting in the theater for a half-hour?)

Mr. Belin. Well, would you state then what happened? You said that you saw him walk into the Texas Theatre?
Mr. Brewer. He walked into the Texas Theatre and I walked up to the theatre, to the box office and asked Mrs. Postal if she sold a ticket to a man who was wearing a brown shirt, and she said no, she hadn't. She was listening to the radio herself. And I said that a man walked in there, and I was going to go inside and ask the usher if he had seen him.

I don't believe that Julia Postal saw anyone, precisely because there wasn't anyone--the entire story about a man sneaking into the theater was made up by Brewer. WC Attorney Belin wondered why Brewer would ask Postal if she sold a man a ticket, when Brewer had supposedly just seen the man sneak into the theater without buying a ticket.

Mr. Belin.  Why did you ask Julia Postal whether he had or hadn't?
Mr. Brewer.   I don't know.
Mr. Belin.  You just asked her?
Mr. Brewer.  Just asked her whether he had bought or she had seen him go in.

Brewer hurried into the theater and asked Butch Burroughs if he had collected a ticket from a man who he thought had just entered the theater and was acting very suspicious (Burroughs indicated he had not collected a ticket). At this point we know that HARVEY Oswald (brown shirt) purchased a ticket, entered the theater around 1:07-1:08 PM, and sat in the lower section. LEE Oswald (white shirt) probably entered the theater around 1:20 PM, purchased a ticket, and took a seat in the balcony.

The Warren Commission asked Butch Burroughs  what he would do if a person entered the theater without purchasing a ticket.

Mr. Ball.  If anybody comes in there without a ticket, what do you do, run them off?
Mr. Burroughs.  I make it a point to stop them and ask them to go out and get a ticket. I just failed to see him when he slipped in.
Mr. Ball.  We will get to that in a minute I want to see what you usually do if somebody comes in without a ticket.
Mr. Burroughs.  I stop them and have them go out to the box office and get an admission ticket.

QUESTION: If you saw someone enter a movie theater, apparently without buying a ticket, how likely is it that you would take any action at all? It's not like it was a violent crime, an assault, where a victim needed help. It's not your theater. It's not your business. Plus, there might be an exigent circumstance, such as that he already bought a ticket but had to do something else first...who knows? So, at most, you might tell a theater employee that someone snuck into the theater, in this case Julia Postal. But, would you take it on yourself to chase this person into the theater? I doubt it....

So, neither Butch Burroughs nor Julia Postal would have called the police, even if they had seen a man sneak into the theater. It was Johnny Brewer who raised such a commotion that Julia finally called the police at 1:44 PM. But readers must remember that Julia was not the only person who called the police about a suspicious man hiding inside of the Texas Theater. JFK researcher Leo Sauvage asked Dallas Assistant District Attorney Jim Bowie whether a telephone call (by Julia Postal) had led to Oswald's arrest. Bowie told Sauvage there was a call from the cashier, but also that there were “Half a dozen calls” to the police concerning a suspicious man sneaking into the theater. A "HALF A DOZEN CALLS" to the police, by a person or persons unknown, is a clear indication of a conspiracy. One of those calls may have come from Jack Ruby's friend, Tommy Rowe, who may have prodded Johnny Brewer into thinking that the suspicious man who snuck into the theater killed officer Tippit. Rowe's "prodding" of Brewer may account for some of the missing minutes. After "HALF A DOZEN" phone calls to the police, the dispatcher finally reported that a suspicious man had gone into the Texas Theater. Twenty six police officers, mostly from 10th & Patton, quickly arrived at the theater, but it is very important for readers to understand that Captain Westbrook was probably the first to arrive.

At some point LEE Oswald may have tried to leave the theater. He could have walked down the rear stairway and out the exit door that opened into the alley.  Behind the theater was a young man standing next to a pickup truck with the engine running. If LEE had left the building,  HARVEY Oswald would be sitting in the theater with the murder weapon. But Burroughs, able to see the west exit door at the bottom of the stairs to the balcony from the concession stand, may have prevented his departure.


We will soon learn that when Capt. Westbrook arrived at the Tippit murder scene he was carrying a wallet that contained identification for Lee Harvey Oswald and Alek Hidell. Neither Croy nor Westbrook discussed the wallet with the police, FBI, SS, nor Warren Commission. Eventually, in 1996, Croy told researchers that he gave the wallet to Westbrook at 10th & Patton, but there is, and never has been, no existing evidence, testimony, or police/FBI reports to support or verify his claim. Croy should have been asked why he didn't give the wallet to any of two dozen regular police officers and detectives who arrived at the scene. Croy should have been asked why he held onto the wallet for 1/2 hour before giving the wallet to Westbrook, who did not arrive at the scene until 1:40 PM. In the authors opinion, Croy never saw the wallet nor had the wallet in his possession at any time.

NOTE: Croy testified before the WC, but nothing was mentioned about the wallet that Croy claimed to have given to Westbrook. Most of the WC questions related to Croy's presence and activities in the basement of the Dallas Police station when HARVEY Oswald was shot and killed by Jack Ruby. In the author's opinion, it was likely Croy who helped Ruby gain entrance to the basement so that he could kill Oswald.


POLICE OFFICERS ARRIVE AT 10TH & PATTON. . . . 

WHILE CAPT. WESTBROOK DRIVES TO A PARKING LOT BEHIND BALLEW TEXACO


Captain W.R. Westbrook had a desk job at police headquarters, where he was in charge of personnel. On 11/22/63 Westbrook took it upon himself to participate in a homicide investigation at the TSBD, yet there are no reports of his presence in that building. This author believes that Westbrook was never in the TSBD. This author believes that Westbrook was one of the police officers looking for HARVEY Oswald on McWatters' bus (circa 12:46 PM). After searching the bus, the author believes that Westbrook and Croy drove to Oak Cliff in an attempt to locate HARVEY Oswald (circa 12:52 PM). Were Westbrook and Croy the two police officers seen by Earlene Roberts, driving past 1026 N. Beckley, circa 1:01 PM?  Westbrook and Croy soon arrived at 410 E. 10th for a pre-arranged meeting with officer Tippit. After witnessing the shooting of officer Tippit, Sgt. Croy remained at 10th & Patton and was seen moments later by Virginia Davis. Capt. Westbrook left the scene, met up with LEE Oswald, and then drove the police vehicle back to the TSBD and arrived around 1:15 PM.

Soon after Westbrook returned to the TSBD, the police dispatcher reported that an officer had been shot in Oak Cliff. Many police officers left the book depository and drove two miles to 10th & Patton. However, their stories differ as to how they got there and who they rode with.

Sgt. Hill. Sgt. Hill, assigned to the personnel bureau, told the WC that he, Sgt. Owens, Assistant DA William Alexander, and an unidentified man rode together in a police car.  They arrived at 10th & Patton about 1:23 PM.

Sgt. Owens told the WC that he got in his police car, with Capt. Westbrook (personnel bureau) and Assistant DA William Alexander. At 1:19 PM Owens reported "en route to 10th & Patton."

Jim Ewell, a reporter for the Dallas Morning News, said that he jumped into the back seat of a car driven by Capt. Westbrook, along with Sgt. H.H. Stringer (assigned to the personnel bureau). Westbrook drove his unmarked police car from the TSBD to Oak Cliff, but did not go to the Tippit murder scene. Westbrook drove his unmarked, dark blue police car to a parking lot behind the Ballew Texaco Station on East Jefferson where the suspect's jacket was found moments later. (Click here for more from Jim Ewell)

Capt. W.R. Westbrook  told the WC that while at the TSBD he heard over his police radio (his police radio!!) that an officer had been shot in Oak Cliff. Westbrook said that he "ran to my radio (my radio!!) because I am the personnel officer and that then became, of course, my greatest interest right at that time, and so, Sergeant Stringer and I and some patrolman---I don't recall his name---then drove to the immediate vicinity of where Officer Tippit had been shot and killed." Westbrook told the WC that he didn't have a car, and that an officer drove him to the scene of the Tippit murder. Yet Westbrook said he heard about the shooting over "his police radio" and then "ran to my radio." Westbrook said, "I don't know where this officer went after he let us out at the scene. Westbrook was lying when he said "some patrolman" drove him to Oak Cliff. Capt. Westbrook drove his dark blue unmarked police car to Oak Cliff. The officer did NOT let Westbrook out at the scene of Tippit's murder, because Westbrook drove his car directly to a parking lot behind 401 E. Jefferson, where moments later the suspect's jacket was found.

None of these people agree as to which officers rode in which car. However, it appears as though Hill, Alexander and an unidentified person rode in one police car and arrived about 1:23 PM. They began searching buildings in the 400 block of East Jefferson, near the Ballew Texaco Station.

At 1:22 PM the police dispatcher reported, "He's a white male, about thirty, five eight, (siren) black hair, slender, wearing a white jacket, a white shirt and dark slacks."

At 1:24 PM the police dispatcher reported, A white male; approximately thirty, about five foot eight, slender build, has black hair, a white jacket; a white shirt and dark trousers.

Jim Ewell said the unmarked dark blue police car was driven by Capt. Westbrook with Sgt. Stringer, Sgt. Owens, and himself riding in the backseat (all three officers assigned to Westbrook in the personnel bureau). They arrived at 401 East Jefferson about 1:25 PM (one block south from 10th & Patton).  It is important for readers to remember that Westbrook told the WC, "I am personnel officer. We conduct all background investigations of applicants, both civilian and police, and then we make--we investigate all personnel complaints--not all of them, but the major ones." Why does a personnel officer, who works at a desk in an office at the police station, involve himself in a homicide investigation? Westbrook told the WC, "I am the personnel officer and that then became (Tippit's murder), of course, my greatest interest right at that time." But Westbrook's actions and whereabouts show that he had very little interest in officer Tippit.  Westbook did not drive to the scene of the Tippit murder at 10th & Patton. He did not drive to the hospital where Tippit was taken by ambulance. He did not visit Tippit's wife later in the day. Westbrook's priority was to drive to the parking lot behind the Ballew Texaco Station on East Jefferson, where moments later the suspect's Eisenhower-type jacket was "found."

Sgt. Owens got out of Westbrook's car and began talking with an attendant at the Texaco Station. Ewell got out of Westbrook's car and hurried to McCandles Minute Market, where he made a telephone call to the "city desk" at the Dallas Morning News and told his employer that he was in Oak Cliff. As Ewell left the Minute Mart he saw Assistant D.A. William Alexander "with an automatic pistol stalking across the balcony of a two story boarding house that police were searching." Sgt. Stringer probably got out of the car and joined fellow officers in shaking down adjacent buildings looking for the suspect.  Westbrook was then alone in his police car and, in the authors opinion, drove past a 1954 Oldsmobile and either threw (LEE) Oswald's jacket under the back end of this car or he already knew the jacket's whereabouts. If Westbrook was not somehow involved with the jacket, then why did he drive from the TSBD directly to this parking lot?
 

Motorcycle officer John R. Mackey was in the parking lot. Mackey said: "About the time we reached the area the dispatcher was broadcasting information regarding the suspect & his escape route. We pulled up on Jefferson & started checking some cars parked behind a service station to see if the suspect was hiding in or under one of the cars. That's when we found his jacket. We saw Captain Westbrook in his car on Jefferson so I turned the jacket over to him." Mackey said that he turned the jacket over to Capt. Westbook. When questioned by the WC, personnel officer Westbrook said that he could not remember the name of the officer who found the jacket. Westbrook told the WC: "…. I walked on towards the parking lot behind the Texaco service station, & some officer...said, 'Look! There's a jacket under the car.... So I walked over & reached under & picked up the jacket." Westbrook said that he picked up the jacket. While Westbrook's and Mackey's stories may differ, both men were seen by Officer Thomas Hutson, who was about 25 yards away. Officer Hutson told the WC that he saw a fellow officer pick up the jacket.

NOTE: In 1978  researcher Larry Ray Harris interviewed John Mackey, who refused to discuss the jacket. Mackey told Harris, "that information might be something they (senior DPD officials) don't want given out." I doubt that "senior DPD officials" would care whether it was Westbrook or Mackey who "found" the jacket. However, "senior DPD officials" would not want to give out any information that suggested Capt. Westbrook was somehow connected to the jacket.

Mr. Belin. All right, now, prior to that time had there been any recovery of any items of clothing?
Mr. Hutson. Yes, sir.
Mr. Belin. When did that occur?
Mr. Hutson. That occurred while we were searching the rear of the house in the 400 block of East Jefferson Boulevard at the rear of the Texaco station (readers should remember that news reporter Jim Ewell saw police searching houses near the Texaco station when they arrived, about 1:23 PM). Behind cars parked on a lot at this location, a white jacket was picked up by another officer. I observed him as he picked it up, and it was stated that this is probably the suspect's jacket. (Hutson said that CAPTAIN WESTBROOK WAS IN THE PARKING LOT, AROUND 1:24-1:25 PM, WHEN OFFICER JOHN MACKEY PICKED UP THE JACKET).
Mr. Belin. What kind of jacket was it?
Mr. Hutson. It looked like a white cloth jacket to me.
Mr. Belin. Was it the zipper type?
Mr. Hutson. I didn't see it that close. I was approximately 25 yards away from the officer who picked it up.

Mr. Belin. What happened to the jacket?
Mr. Hutson. The last time I saw this jacket, the officer had it in his possession.
Mr. Belin. Do you know who he gave it to?
Mr. Hutson. No, sir; I don't.
Mr. Belin. You don't know if he gave it to Captain Westbrook?
Mr. Hutson. I don't know. Captain Westbrook was there behind the house with us, and he was there at the time this was picked up with the man, but I don't know who had it in their hands. The only time I saw it was when the officer had it.


At 1:25 PM, only one minute after finding the jacket, the DPD dispatcher received information from unit #279 that the suspect had "dumped it [jacket] on this parking lot behind this service station at 400 block East Jefferson across from Dudley Hughes and he had a white jacket on. We believe this is it." But why would a motorcycle patrolman (Mackey) radio in such information when Capt. Westbrook was with him? The police dispatch logs show "unit #279" reported finding the jacket, but the log does not identify the officer by name. This unit number was used by two officers--J.T. Griffin and J.R. Mackey. The author believes that the officer who identified himself as unit #279 was not Mackey, but was Capt. Westbrook, who used Mackey's unit number when he called the dispatcher. Interested readers should listen to the DPD police dispatch recording of unit #279. The voice is that of a middle-age man (Westbrook?), not a young man (Mackey).

NOTE: Officer John Mackey supposedly found the jacket, along with Capt. Westbrook, but why did neither policeman initial the jacket or write a police report about finding the jacket? Why was Mackey never interviewed by the FBI, SS, WC, or HSCA and asked about finding and identifying the suspects jacket? Because Westbrook was trying to hide his involvement and any connection with the suspect's jacket.


Nothing concerning this jacket, allegedly thrown down by the man who shot and killed officer Tippit, was discussed nor mentioned in the police logs for the next 20 minutes. Why?

When questioned by the WC about the jacket, Westbrook said "actually, I didn't find it--it was pointed out to me by either some officer that--that was while we were going over the scene in the close area where the shooting was concerned [the parking lot was 1 1/2 blocks from 10th & Patton], someone pointed out a jacket to me that was laying under a car and I got the jacket and told the officer to take the license number." Westbrook failed to identify the officer who discovered the jacket, because it was Westbrook who "planted" the jacket in the parking lot. Westbrook then said that he turned the jacket over to one of the officers, yet he could not remember the name of this officer. Capt. Westbrook, in charge of personnel, could not remember the name of the officer who gave him the jacket nor the name of the officer to whom he gave the jacket? More lies from Westbrook.

Mr. Ball. You were just looking around to see what you could see?
Mr. Westbrook. Yes; and at this time I had a shotgun--I had borrowed a shotgun from a patrolman.
Mr. Ball. Where did you go when you got out of the car?
Mr. Westbrook. I walked through, and this is a car lot or a parking area right along in here, and I don't know whether I am wrong on my location on not, but I think I'm right.
Mr. Ball. You walked through a car lot, did you?
Mr. Westbrook. Yes, sir; and I think I came out---is that a church---there's a church right there close by.
Mr. Ball. Was there a station anywhere near there, a service station?
Mr. Westbrook. Oh, there could have been--yes, sir. There was either a used-car lot or a parking lot--that I don't know.
Mr. Ball. On what street?
Mr. Westbrook. It was actually on Jefferson, but the place where this jacket was found would have been back closer to the alley, Mr. Ball.
Mr. Ball. Behind the Texaco service station?
Mr. Westbrook. Yes; behind the Texaco service station, and some officer, I feel sure it was an officer, I still can't be positive pointed this jacket out to me and it was laying slightly under the rear of one of the cars.
Mr. Ball. What was the name of the officer?
Mr. Westbrook. I couldn't tell you that, sir.
Mr. Westbrook. Now, I did, when I left this scene, I turned this jacket over to one of the officers and I went by that church, I think, and I think that would be on 10th Street.
Mr. Ball. I show you Commission Exhibit 162, do you recognize that?
Mr. Westbrook. That is exactly the jacket we found.
Mr. Ball. That is the jacket you found?
Mr. Westbrook. Yes, sir.
Mr. Ball. And you turned it over to whom?
Mr. Westbrook. Now, it was to this officer--that got the name.
Mr. Ball. Does your report show the name of the officer?
Mr. Westbrook. No, sir; it doesn't. When things like this happen--it was happening so fast you don't remember those things.




At left is LEE Oswald photographed by his brother Robert in 1958.  At right is the jacket allegedly found
under a car near the Texaco station after the Tippit slaying. Are the jackets the same? 


1:33 PM Eight minutes after receiving information relating to the suspects jacket, the police dispatcher was still using the original description of the suspect, "….white jacket, white shirt and dark slacks." Why? At this point the description of the suspect should have been "white shirt and dark slacks."


1:33 PM (Sgt. Owens to dispatcher). We're shaking down these old houses out here in the 400 block of East Jefferson right now.


1:34 PM officer M.N. McDonald requests more police squads to search the Abundant Life Temple.


1:34 PM Capt. Westbrook asks the dispatcher, "What officer have you got commanding this area over here where this officer was shot?"


1:34 PM Capt. Westbrook reported, "We've got a witness that seen him go north….after….shed his jacket." But Capt. Westbrook was lying. Westbrook never had a witness, but he needed a witness to say that the jacket belonged to a man who matched the description of the suspect. Without a witness, there was no way to connect the jacket to the man who shot Tippit. Westbrook was the only officer who said there was a witness that saw the suspect shed his jacket, but no such witness was ever identified or located. More lies from Capt. Westbrook, in order to link the jacket to the suspect.


1:35 PM The police dispatcher was still using the original description of the suspect, "….wearing a light grey Eisenhower-type jacket (why?), dark trousers, and a white shirt."


At 1:36 PM Officer C.T. Walker reported that a man fitting the description of the Tippit suspect ran into the Jefferson Branch library. Capt. Westbrook drove a few blocks to the library.


At 1:38 PM Sgt. Owens told the police dispatcher the man at the library "was the wrong man." Capt. Westbrook then drove to the Tippit murder scene for the first time, but for a very short time. There were now many police and dozens and dozens of on-lookers with whom he could mingle. 


CAPT. WESTBROOK, with Lee Oswald's wallet, DRIVES TO 10TH & PATTON

Around 1:36 PM  Capt. Westbrook left the parking lot and drove a few blocks west to the library, in response to a report that a suspicious man was seen entering the building. After Sgt. Owens reported it was the wrong man at the library Capt. Westbrook drove to the Tippit murder scene for the first time.

NOTE: If Westbrook was the man seen by Mrs. Holan inspecting Tippit's body after he was shot and killed, then Westbrook's return to 10th & Patton had to be very brief. Otherwise, witnesses may have remembered his presence at 10th & Patton when Tippit was murdered.

Westbrook's reason for driving to 10th & Patton was to show fellow police officers the wallet given to him a half hour earlier by LEE Oswald. Identification in this wallet would identify "Lee Harvey Oswald" as the prime suspect in the murder of officer Tippit. Identification for Alek Hidell would link Oswald/Hidell to the rifle found on the 6th floor of the TSBD. There were now many police and dozens and dozens of on-lookers with whom Westbrook could mingle. Hopefully, nobody would recognize Westbrook as the man who was with LEE Oswald when Tippit was shot and killed.

Between 1:38 PM and 1:40 PM Capt. Westbrook arrived at 10th & Patton and ordered officers to search the area west of the shooting scene (in the direction of the Texas Theater).  He then began showing fellow officers the 2nd Oswald wallet. A few minutes later (1:42 PM) crime lab officers George Doughty, W.E. Barnes, and Paul Bentley arrived and inspected the wallet produced by Westbrook. FBI Agent Bob Barrett arrived, parked his car, and walked toward Tippit's patrol car. Barrett explained, "I went on over there and Captain Westbrook was there with several of his officers.... It hadn't been very long when Westbrook looked up and saw me and called me over. He had this wallet in his hand. Now, I don't know where he found it, but he had the wallet in his hand... the wallet was there. There's no getting around that. Westbrook had the wallet in his hand and asked me if I knew who these people were. I'm adamant that there was a wallet in somebody's hand and (Westbrook) asked me if I knew who 'Lee Harvey Oswald' was and who 'Hidell' were."  As Westbrook showed the wallet to Barrett and fellow DPD officers WFAA-TV (Channel 8) news photographer Ron Reiland filmed the event. In the photo below Sgt. Bud Owens is holding the wallet and Capt. Doughty is looking at the wallet. Westbrook's possession of the wallet shows that he knew LEE Oswald, and knew about the pre-planned assassination of Officer Tippit. About 4-5 minutes after arriving at 10th & Patton Capt. Westbrook reclaimed the wallet and returned to the parking lot behind the Texaco Station.

NOTE: Identification from the wallet guaranteed that HARVEY Oswald was the prime suspect in the murder of Officer Tippit and President Kennedy. If HARVEY Oswald had not been found in the Texas Theater, a nationwide manhunt would have begun for the former "defector," the "communist" supporter of Castro, the man (Hidell) who ordered a 6.5 mm Mannlicher-Carcano from Klein's, the man who ordered a .38 revolver from SeaPort traders, the man who left the TSBD after President Kennedy was shot, and the man whose identification was found in a wallet at the Tippit murder scene. The wallet produced by Westbrook at the Tippit murder scene is the best single piece of evidence that proves both conspiracy and the framing of HARVEY Oswald. This wallet was never initialed by DPD officers, never entered into evidence, never turned over to the identification bureau or homicide department, never mentioned in police reports or FBI reports or discussed with the Warren Commission. This wallet, shown to officers for only a few minutes, was last seen in Westbrook's hands and then disappeared.




A frame from Ron Reiland's WFAA newsreel footage



Both Westbrook and Croy were interviewed by the WC, but neither man discussed the wallet with the FBI, WC, or anyone at any time. In 1996 Croy, for the first time, told researchers that an "unknown witness" gave him gave the wallet, which he then gave to Westbrook. It should not surprise anyone to learn there is no existing evidence to support or verify his claim. Not one witness, not one ambulance driver, not one neighbor, and not one bystander nor anyone saw a wallet lying on the street, in Tippit's car or anywhere. Ted Calloway arrived before Tippit's body was loaded in the ambulance. Callaway said, "I'll tell you one thing, there was no billfold at that scene. If there was, there would have been too many people who would have seen it." Because of their actions and involvement at 10th & Patton, we now know that Westbrook, Croy, and LEE Oswald conspired to murder Officer Tippit, and frame HARVEY Oswald for the crime.

CAPT. WESTBROOK RETURNS TO THE PARKING LOT

Westbrook was only at the Tippit murder scene for a few minutes, but that was long enough for Westbrook to show LEE Oswald's wallet to fellow police officers.  After showing the wallet, and identifying the suspect as Lee Harvey Oswald, Westbrook reclaimed the wallet and returned to the parking lot behind the Texaco Station. While at 10th & Patton Westbrook likely told crime lab officers George Doughty and W.E. Barnes about the jacket in the nearby parking lot. They then accompanied or followed Westbrook to the parking lot where they photographed a 1954 Oldsmobile under which the jacket was allegedly found.WFAA-TV (Channel 8) news photographer Ron Reiland may also have accompanied Westbrook to the parking lot where a brief film clip was made of an officer holding the jacket.



Ballew Texaco Station (parking lot is behind the station)
Jacket found under this 1954 Oldsmobile


Jacket  held by police officer

At 1:44 PM someone called the police dispatcher and said, "The jacket the suspect was wearing over here on Jefferson bears a laundry tag with the letter B 9738. See if there is any way you can check this laundry tag." The police logs identify the caller as Sgt. Stringer (personnel bureau). However, when interviewed in 1978 by researcher Larry Ray Harris, Stringer said, "I never did see the jacket, and I didn't radio in on it." It appears that Capt. Westbrook, using Sgt. Stringer's call sign, radioed the police dispatcher and provided information about the laundry tag on the jacket. Reporter Jim Ewell said, "I was with Westbrook as we all went over to examine the jacket because it was the only tangible thing we had at the moment that belonged to the killer. In fact, I held the jacket in my hands."

At 1:44 PM the police dispatcher reported, "Have information a suspect just went in the Texas Theater on West Jefferson ... supposed to be hiding in balcony" (17H418). Reporter Jim Ewell recalled, "They were discussing it [the jacket] when the report came in that a suspect had just gone into the Texas Theater. Immediately, Capt. Westbrook and Sergeant Stringer ran back to their car, which was across the street, and I ran to jump in the backseat. By that time, they were already turning out and accelerating. When I got in the backseat with the door still hanging open, I came out of the car hanging onto to the door. They slowed down long enough for me to get back in." Capt. Westbrook, however, said nothing about running to his car and racing to the theater. He told the WC, "when I left this scene, I turned this jacket over to one of the officers and I went by that church, I think, and I think that would be on 10th Street." But Capt. Westbrook was lying. He did not give the jacket to one of the officers. Westbrook held onto the jacket. He had crime lab personnel initial the jacket for evidence (Barnes and Doughty). Westbrook then took the jacket to police headquarters (arrived circa 2:10 PM), wrote a police report about the jacket, and placed the jacket in evidence at 3:00 PM.


NOTE: Less than 10 minutes after Tippit was shot and killed Westbrook had possession of three very important items of evidence that belonged to the suspect--including LEE Oswald's jacket and LEE Oswald's wallet. This author believes the suspect (LEE Oswald) gave these items to Capt. Westbrook (who was present when LEE Oswald shot Tippit) prior to arriving at the Texas Theater. We know that Westbrook did everything he could to distance himself from the jacket. We know the wallet produced by Westbrook and shown to officers at 10th & Patton disappeared. The author also believes that LEE Oswald gave the .38 revolver that he used to murder officer Tippit to Westbrook (LEE Oswald could not take any of these items into the theater fearing that, if he was still there when the police arrived, he would be searched). A half hour after HARVEY Oswald's arrest at the theater these three items of evidence (wallet, jacket, .38 revolver) were in Capt. Westbrooks office at police headquarters.

CAPT. WESTBROOK DRIVES TO THE TEXAS THEATER

Jim Ewell said that when they arrived at the Texas Theater, Capt. Westbrook parked his unmarked dark blue police car directly in front of the theater (see photo by Stuart Reed). This is a good indication that Westbrook was the first police officer to arrive at the theater. Everybody jumped out and went into the lobby. Ewell was very clear that it was Westbrook who drove the police car. But Capt. Westbrook told the WC a very different story. Westbrook told the WC, "Sergeant Stringer, I, and (FBI) Agent Barrett got in another squad car, and I don't know what officer was driving this one, but then when we arrived and were approaching the theatre, I directed the patrolman to turn down into the alley instead of going around to the front because I figured there would be a lot of cars at the front. There were two or three at the back. So, I and Barrett---Stringer went to another door, and I and Barrett---we stopped at the first one---we got out and walked to this first entrance that was nearest us, and as we walked into the door we met an employee of the theatre. Again, Capt. Westbrook was lying. FBI Agent Bob Barrett did not ride to the theater with Westbrook. In a 1977 interview for the HSCA, Westbrook said that Barrett drove his own vehicle to the theater. Barrett, in a 1996 interview, confirmed that he drove himself to the theater in his own car. Westbrook lied to the Warren Commission.

Westbrook drove his dark blue unmarked police car to the theater, but told the WC that a patrolman drove him to the theater. Westbrook parked his police car directly in front of the theater on Jefferson Blvd., yet told the WC he directed a patrolman to turn down the alley behind the theater.  Westbrook was lying. Nearly everything Westbrook said concerning the jacket and his involvement with the Tippit shooting was a lie. Westbrook had to lie, in order to conceal his involvement in the Tippit murder.



RUBY'S FRIEND, TOMMY ROWE, POINTED OUT HARVEY OSWALD TO THE POLICE

HARVEY Oswald, wearing a dark brown shirt (not a white jacket), had been in the theater since 1:07 to 1:08 PM. He sat next to Jack Davis, changed seats a few times, purchased popcorn from Butch Burroughs at 1:15 PM, and was then seen sitting next to a pregnant woman (by Burroughs). The only "Oswald" that Brewer could have seen at 1:35 PM, if he saw anyone, would have been LEE Oswald, wearing a  short-sleeve white t-shirt  as described by the police dispatch. But who does Brewer identify to the police in the theater? The man wearing a  dark brown long  sleeve shirt--HARVEY Oswald. I don't know if Johnny Brewer was  a minor co-conspirator or a "wannabe." But  I do know that when Brewer described the man he claimed to have seen in his store to Julia Postal (dark brown long-sleeve shirt) and to the WC, his description was very different than the suspect described by the police dispatcher (white shirt). Because of Brewer, the police were called to the theater and arrested HARVEY Oswald, the man wearing the long sleeve dark brown shirt. Brewer lied about hearing (HARVEY) Oswald's description on the radio broadcast. Brewer lied about Oswald acting suspicious and being scared in front of his store. Brewer lied to Julia Postal. He lied to Butch Burroughs. Brewer lied to the police when he identified the man wearing the dark brown shirt  (HARVEY Oswald) as the "suspicious man" who snuck into the theater. Brewer lied to the Warren Commission. Brewer had to lie, because Brewer never saw anyone in front of his store. There are clear indications that Brewer may have been given the description of the man arrested in the theater (dark brown, long sleeve shirt) by a co-worker in his shoe store. Brewer most certainly did not see HARVEY Oswald, wearing a long sleeve brown shirt, sneak into the theater at 1:07 PM. Nor did Brewer see LEE Oswald, wearing a white t-shirt, sneak into the theater around 1:20 PM.

Tommy Rowe, a very close friend of Jack Ruby's, worked at Hardy's Shoe Store with Johnny Brewer. In 1964 Rowe told researcher/publisher Penn Jones that it was he who told shoe store manager Johnny Brewer that he saw a man wearing a brown shirt enter the Texas Theater (click here to see Midlothian Mirror editorial about Tommy Rowe) . Inside the darkened theater Rowe claims that it was he (NOT Brewer) who directed the police to the man wearing the long sleeved brown shirt--HARVEY Oswald. Rowe was never interviewed by the DPD or FBI. For years after the assassination Rowe told friends, relatives, and JFK researchers that it was he, NOT Brewer, who pointed out (HARVEY) Oswald to the police in the dark of the Texas Theater. Rowe was so close to Jack Ruby that he moved into Ruby's apartment when Ruby went to jail for killing HARVEY Oswald . In 1967 the New Orleans District Attorney's office interviewed Tommy Rowe, who lived in Apt. 206 at 223 S. Ewing (the apartment next to the one occupied by Jack Ruby in 1963). If Rowe's statement is true then Johnny Brewer lied to Julia Postal, lied to the police, lied to the FBI, and lied to the WC. He never followed the man in the brown shirt, or anyone else, to the theater. The man responsible for getting the police to the Texas theater appears to have been Jack Ruby's friend, Tommy Rowe. And it appears that Johnny Brewer may have been merely a "wannabe" and not a co-conspirator.

NOTE: if Rowe's story is true, then we have to wonder how Rowe knew about a man (HARVEY OSWALD) wearing a dark brown long sleeve shirt in the Texas Theater. Rowe's close relationship with Jack Ruby may be the answer. Theater patron George Applin said that he saw Jack Ruby sitting in a seat at the back of the theater as Oswald was being subdued and arrested by police.

LEE Oswald probably arrived at the theater  8-9 minutes after shooting Tippit,  around 1:20 PM, and he was wearing a white short-sleeve shirt (not a dark brown long sleeve shirt).When the police arrived, they already knew the name of their suspect from identification in the wallet produced by Capt. Westbrook. And Westbrook probably knew that HARVEY Oswald was in possession of a loaded .38 revolver. If HARVEY displayed the revolver or pointed it at the police, he would be shot and killed.

POLICE ARRIVE AT THE TEXAS THEATER

The plan may have been to kill (HARVEY) Oswald inside the dark theater, if and when Oswald pointed his .38 revolver (allegedly with a defective firing pin) at the police. But the one thing the conspirators could not control was the number of potential witnesses, both civilian and police. Too many witnesses would make killing (HARVEY) Oswald inside the theater difficult, if not impossible.

Capt. Westbrook parked his unmarked, dark blue police vehicle directly in front of the theater.  Jim Ewell said, "I went up these stairs into the balcony. I stepped to the railing where I could look down onto this. Then I saw the fight that broke out. Someone was trying to hold the barrel of a shotgun, or train the barrel of a shotgun down among the heads of these officers. I don't know what was going on, but this person was holding a shotgun; I did see that." The only Dallas police officer known to have a shotgun at the Tippit murder scene was Capt. Westbrook.

POLICE IN THE BALCONY. The police dispatcher reported that the suspect was wearing dark trousers and a white t-shirt" and "Have information a suspect just went in the Texas Theater on West Jefferson ... supposed to be hiding in balcony." Deputy Sheriff Bill Courson entered the front of the theater, hurried up the stairs to the balcony, and was "reasonably satisfied in his own mind" that he met Lee Harvey Oswald com­ing down the front stairs. If this young man was LEE Oswald, then he was wearing a white t-shirt and dark trousers. Lt. Cunningham and Detective J.B. Toney encountered the young man and began to question him, perhaps because he matched the description of the suspect. As Deputy Sheriff Buddy Walthers rushed up the stairs to the balcony, he saw the officers as they were questioning the young man.

When police arrived in the alley, behind the theater, Capt. C.E. Talbert noticed a young man standing beside a pickup truck with the engine running. Officers questioned the young man and searched the pickup, but made no police reports about the incident. Talbert testified before the Warren Commission, but at no time in over 20 pages of testimony was he asked, nor did he volunteer, anything about the Texas Theater, Oswald's arrest, or the young man in the alley (24H242). We will probably never know the name of this man nor will we know what he was doing in the alley while LEE Oswald was hiding in the balcony.

POLICE IN THE LOWER AREA. When Johnny Brewer opened the rear exit door of the theater, the police were waiting in the alley. Brewer claimed that he pointed out (HARVEY) Oswald to the police inside the theater. However, this may not be true. A very close friend of Jack Ruby's, Tommy Rowe, worked at Hardy's Shoe Store with Brewer. In 1964 Rowe told friends, relatives, and JFK researchers that it was he, NOT Brewer, who pointed out (HARVEY) Oswald to the police in the dark of the Texas Theater. Rowe was so close to Jack Ruby that Rowe moved into Ruby's apartment when Ruby went to jail for killing HARVEY Oswald. (Click here to see Midlothian Mirror editorial about Tommy Rowe.)  (Click here for a 3/1/68 Los Angeles Free Press interview with Penn Jones and Roger Craig also discussing Tommy Rowe.) Unfortunately, Tommy Rowe was never interviewed by the DPD or FBI or WC or HSCA. It is worth repeating that in 1967 the New Orleans District Attorney's office interviewed Tommy Rowe, who lived in Apt. 206 at 223 S. Ewing (the same apartment occupied by Jack Ruby in 1963). Mr. Rowe said that he told shoe store manager Johnny Brewer that he saw a man wear­ing a brown shirt enter the Texas Theater on the afternoon of November 22, 1963. If Rowe's statement is true then Johnny Brewer never saw the man in the brown shirt in front of his store, enter the theater, nor did he point out (HARVEY) to the police.

HARVEY OSWALD, WITH A LOADED .38 REVOLVER, IS ARRESTED

Capt. Westbrook parked his unmarked, dark blue police vehicle directly in front of the theater.  Jim Ewell said, "I went up these stairs into the balcony. I stepped to the railing where I could look down onto this. Then I saw the fight that broke out. Someone was trying to hold the barrel of a shotgun, or train the barrel of a shotgun down among the heads of these officers. I don't know what was going on, but this person was holding a shotgun; I did see that." The only Dallas police officer known to have a shotgun at the Tippit murder scene was Capt. Westbrook.

As the police scuffled with HARVEY Oswald, Officer McDonald grabbed the revolver from Oswald's hand and passed it to Officer Bob Carroll. After Oswald was handcuffed, Capt. Westbrook ordered his officers to “cover his face” and “get him out of here” (“cover his face” because Westbrook knew that LEE Oswald was also in the theater. The two young men, Harvey and Lee, looked very much alike, and it would be difficult to explain why they were in the Texas Theater at the same time.) As HARVEY Oswald was taken out the front of the theater a DPD officer told Julia Postal, "we have our man on both counts." Julia said this was the first time she heard of Tippit's death and the officers arresting Oswald had identified him by calling his name-- "Oswald" (interview with Julia Postal by SA Carter 2/28/64). Thanks to Captain Westbrook, most of the police officers participating in Oswald's arrest already knew his name.

NOTE:  As noted above, Jones Harris, a long time assassination investigator, arrived in Dallas the day after the assassination. He interviewed Julia Postal in the office of the manager of the Texas Theater. Harris asked her, when she saw (HARVEY) Oswald being led out of the theater by the police, if she had sold him a ticket. Postal immediately burst into tears. Harris walked out of the office and returned a short time later. When Harris asked again if she sold (HARVEY) Oswald a ticket she again burst into tears. Butch Burroughs, interviewed by Texas researcher Jim Marrs, said that Julia Postal knows that she sold (HARVEY) Oswald a ticket. Burroughs collected movie tickets when patrons entered the theater. When Burroughs sold HARVEY Oswald popcorn, a few minutes after he entered the theater, he must have recognized (HARVEY) Oswald as a paying customer. Otherwise, Burroughs would have asked him if he bought a ticket.

HARVEY Oswald, wearing a long sleeve brown shirt, was brought out the front entrance of the Texas Theater and placed in Capt. Westbrook's dark blue, unmarked police car. Stuart L. Reed, the 30-year army veteran who took a photo of McWatters' bus on Elm St., took another photo of McWatters' bus near the TSBD, and took a photo of the 6th floor window at the TSBD, was now taking photos of HARVEY Oswald's arrest.

NOTE: Stuart Reed took all of these photos, which sequentially followed Oswald's movements, from about 12:40 PM (McWatters' bus) thru 1:50 PM (Oswald's arrest). Reed should have been asked why he took photos of the front and back of McWatters' bus (circa 1:36-1:42), and how he knew to take a photo of the 6th floor window long before it was identified as the "sniper's nest" (circa 1:45 PM ) and how me managed to get to the Texas Theater where Oswald was arrested (1:52 PM). How did Reed know where and when to take all of these photos, from locations miles apart, in a matter of 16 minutes? Reed dropped his film off at a photo lab in Dallas, and then hurried to New Orleans to catch a boat to the Canal Zone, where he worked for the US Army. Prior to boarding the boat, Reed signed an authorization that allowed the FBI to pick up his developed photo slides in Dallas. The FBI told the WC that a government executive (Reed), answering to the military, took the photos. This seemed to satisfy the WC, and Reed dropped out of sight without ever seeing his photos.

Jim Ewell watched as the police brought HARVEY Oswald out the front of the theater. Ewell said, "The next thing I recall is that I was out on the street with the car that I arrived in (Capt. Westbrook's unmarked police car) between me and the officers bringing Oswald out of the theater as they kind of separated the crowd and made an aisle for him to come through to get to the car. I'd say that I was about ten to twelve feet away from Oswald at the time." Jim Ewell said, "Oswald then took my place in the backseat of the same car that I arrived in [the car driven by Capt. Westbrook]." Officer Bob Carrol carried HARVEY Oswald's revolver to the police car, and handed it to Sgt. Hill (who worked for Westbrook). Officer Carrol drove, with officer K.E. Lyons sitting on the right and officer Gerry Hill in the middle of the front seat. HARVEY Oswald was in the backseat with officer Paul Bentley on his right and C.T. Walker on his left.  Capt. Westbrook, when interviewed by the WC, said nothing about Oswald being driven to police headquarters in his unmarked police car.

From the police dispatch at 1:44 PM it had taken the Dallas police less than eight minutes to drive from 10th & Patton to the Texas Theater, arrest HARVEY Oswald, place him in the police car, and begin driving him to the police station (1:52 PM).

Mr. Belin. That last call then was made at 1:53 p.m., in which you advised who was in the car?
Mr. Hill. With us en route to the station.
Mr. Belin. And the first one that you made after you got to the car was at 1:52 p.m.?

Mr. Belin. Now after, from the time you started in motion until the time you called in, do you remember anyone saying anything at all in the car?
Mr. Hill. The suspect was asked what his name was.
Mr. Belin. What did he say?
Mr. Hill. He never did answer. He just sat there.
Mr. Belin. Was he asked where he lived?
Mr. Hill. That was the second question that was asked the suspect, and he didn't answer it, either. About the time I got through with the radio transmission, I asked Paul Bentley, "Why don't you see if he has any identification." Paul was sitting sort of sideways in the seat, and with his right hand he reached down and felt of the suspect's left hip pocket and said, "Yes, he has a billfold," and took it out. I never did have the billfold in my possession, but the name Lee Oswald was called out by Bentley from the back seat, and said this identification, I believe, was on the library card. And he also made the statement that there was some more identification in this other name which I don't remember, but it was the same name that later came in the paper that he bought the gun under.

QUESTION: Bentley found identification for Lee Oswald in this wallet, but there was no mention of any identification for Alek Hidell

Bentley told WFAA-TV (11/23/63), "I removed his wallet from his back pocket and obtained his identification." Sgt. Hill said, "the only way we found out what his name was was to remove his billfold and check it ourselves; he wouldn't even tell us what his name was." Paul Bentley removed HARVEY Oswald's wallet from his left rear pocket en route to the DPD headquarters (along with Officers Carrol, Hill, Walker and Lyons) and found identification for "Lee Harvey Oswald." Bentley and Hill had possession of HARVEY Oswald's wallet, while Capt. Westbrook had possession of a 2nd "Oswald" wallet. These two wallets could have created serious problems, and alerted the public to the possibility of two Lee Harvey Oswalds, if properly identified as evidence and reported. HARVEY Oswald's wallet and contents were turned in at police headquarters where all items were inventoried and photographed. But the wallet that appeared in the hands of Capt. Westbrook at 10th & Patton was unexplainable. A 2nd Oswald wallet could never, ever be made public, and quickly disappeared--last seen in the hands of Capt. Westbrook.

Mr. Belin. Would the name Hidell mean anything? Alek Hidell?
Mr. Hill. That would be similar. I couldn't say specifically that is what it was, because this was a conversation and I never did see it written down, but that sounds like the name that I heard.
Mr. Belin. Was this the first time you learned of the name?
Mr. Hill. Yes; it was.
Mr. Belin. All right; when did you learn of his address?
Mr. Hill. There were two different addresses on the identification. One of them was in Oak Cliff. The other one was in Irving. But as near as I can recall of the conversation in the car, this was strictly conversation, because I didn't read any of the stuff. It didn't have an address on Beckley, that I recall hearing.
Mr. Belin. Was he ever asked again where he lived, up to the time you got to the station?
Mr. Hill. No; I don't believe so, because when Bentley got the identification out, we had two different addresses. We had two different names, and the comment was made, "I guess we are going to have to wait until we get to the station to find out who he actually is."


Contents of wallet removed from HARVEY Oswald by Paul Bentley.  Bottom center is Dallas library card
  with address 604 Elsbeth (in Oak Cliff).  The North Beckley address was not on any ID from this wallet.


It is worth remembering that (HARVEY) Oswald never gave the police his name or address while riding in the squad car to police headquarters.

NOTE: There were a total of five Oswald wallets: a black plastic wallet (CE 1798); a red billfold found at Ruth Paine's (CE 2003 #382); a brown billfold found at Ruth Paine's (CE 2003 #114); a billfold taken from LHO upon arrest--initialed by HMM (Henry Moore), wallet and contents inventoried and photographed; and the Westbrook wallet, which was not initialed by police, not listed in inventory, not photographed, not mentioned by a single witness to the FBI, WC, HSCA, ARRB, etc. and disappeared, but not before it was filmed by Ron Reiland of WFAA TV and seen by FBI agent Bob Barrett and other police officers.

Before leaving the Texas Theater, Capt. Westbrook ordered Detective Taylor, Lt. Cunningham, and J.B. Tony "to take the names and addresses of the occupants of the theater." Detective Taylor noted in his report (CE 2003, page 97, at WCH 24/243) that he, Lt. Cunningham, and J.B. Tony remained at the theater following the arrest "and took the names and addresses of the occupants of the theater." These officers would likely have turned their completed lists over to the man who gave them the order, Captain Westbrook. But these lists of theater patrons, like the wallet produced by Westbrook at 10th & Patton, disappeared and were never seen again. There was no chain of evidence regarding the list of theater patrons or the wallet, no police reports, and both items simply disappeared. The WC, perhaps intentionally, did not take the testimony of Taylor, Cunningham, or Tony. They could have asked any of these officers what they did with their completed lists. The WC did ask Westbrook about the list of theater patrons and, as can be expected, he answered "No; possibly Lieutenant Cunningham will know, but I don't know who has the list."

The WC asked Westbrook what he did after Oswald was arrested (1:51 PM). Westbrook told the WC that he “went back to city hall and resumed my desk.”

Mr. Ball.  Did you see him taken from the theatre?
Mr. Westbrook.  No sir; because I went the other way.
Mr. Ball.  You went to the back?
Mr. Westbrook. Yes.  He went out the front and I never saw Oswald again--that's the last time I saw him."

Westbrook may not have seen HARVEY Oswald again after he was arrested, but he most likely saw LEE Oswald and may have escorted him out the back of the theater. Deputy Sheriff Bill Courson saw a young man in the balcony who looked identical to Lee Harvey Oswald. One police homicide report of Tippit's murder reads, "suspect was later arrested in the balcony of the Texas theater at 231 W. Jefferson." At least two other DPD documents reported the arrest occurred in the balcony. In his report to Captain Gannaway, Dallas Police Detective L.D. Stringfellow wrote: "On Novemberr 22, 1963, Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested in the balcony of the Texas Theater, 231 West Jefferson Blvd., and was charged with the murder of President John F. Kennedy and the murder of Officer JD Tippit." How could several experienced, career police officers and detectives report that Oswald was arrested in the balcony, when he was arrested in the lower section?

Something happened in the 2nd floor balcony. The author speculates that LEE Oswald may have been momentarily arrested or detained in the balcony of the theater. Deputy Sheriff Bill Courson hurried up the stairs to the balcony and was "reasonably satisfied in his own mind" that he met Lee Harvey Oswald com­ing down the front stairs. Lt. Cunningham and Detective J.B. Toney encountered the young man and began to question him. As Deputy Sheriff Buddy Walthers rushed up the stairs to the balcony, he saw the officers as they were questioning the young man.

Sgt. Jerry Hill and Det. Paul Bentley were checking fire escapes in the balcony when Hill opened the exit door to the fire escape. Sgt. Stringer, standing in the alley below, heard someone inside the theater yell "We got him." The police officer inside the theater may have thought the man on the staircase, being questioned by Lieutenant Cunningham and Toney, was under ar­rest, which caused him to shout "we got him." This young man may have been wearing a white t-shirt and dark pants, which matched the description of the suspect as reported by the police dispatcher. But an unknown person, who identified himself as the "manager on duty," said the young man had been in the theater since 12:05 PM. The unidentified "manager on duty" may have been an accomplice who provided Oswald with a much needed alibi, as theater manager John Callaghan left the theater before the police arrived (Julia Postal, Butch Burroughs, and the projectionist were the only employees left in the theater). The young man was released. Sgt. Stringer, standing below in the alley, asked Hill if the suspect had been arrested. Hill looked back into the balcony area and said, "No, we haven't got him."

Something happened in the 2nd floor balcony that caused a police officer to yell, "We got him." Something caused veteran police officers to write reports that Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested in the balcony. Something happened in the 2nd floor balcony.

LEE OSWALD IS TAKEN OUT THE BACK OF THE THEATER

After HARVEY Oswald was arrested and taken out the front of the theater, LEE Oswald was escorted out the back of the theater. There is no police report, no record of arrest, nor any mention of a person taken out the rear of the theater. Capt. Westbrook saw LEE Oswald shoot officer Tippit at 10th & Patton. Capt. Westbrook produced a 2nd Oswald wallet at 10th & Patton. Capt. Westbrook either planted or knew exactly where to find the suspect's jacket. Capt. Westbrook was the first police officer to arrive at the theater. Capt. Westbrook told his officers to cover (HARVEY) Oswalds face and get him out of here. Capt. Westbrook ordered police to compile a list of the names and addresses of theater patrons, a list that soon disappeared. Capt. Westbrook was the highest ranking officer at the Texas Theater, and it was likely that Capt. Westbrook escorted LEE Oswald out the rear of the theater. During author James Douglas's 2007 interview with theater concessionaire Butch Burroughs,  Burroughs said that he saw two different people arrested in the Texas Theater.  He saw (Harvey) Oswald's arrest and then, "three or four minutes later," watched as the Dallas police arrested "an Oswald lookalike."  Burroughs added that the second man arrested "looked almost like Oswald, like he was his brother or something."  Apparently, Butch Burroughs saw both Harvey and Lee at the Texas Theater.

Bernard Haire, owner of a hobby shop two doors east of the theater, saw the police escort a young man who he thought was LEE Oswald out the rear of the theater. Perhaps the young man in the balcony, who was identified by Deputy Sheriff Bill Courson as LEE Oswald, was this man. For the next 25 years Mr. Haire thought he had seen the arrest of Oswald. If Bernard Haire and Butch Burroughs observed "LEE" Oswald taken out the back of the theater then who, if not Captain Westbrook, was responsible for escorting him out of the back of the theater? After all, it was likely Capt. Westbrook who watched his co-conspirator, LEE Oswald, murder Tippit at 10th Patton only a half hour earlier. After he was taken out the rear of the theater, someone (perhaps Croy) then drove LEE Oswald to a two-tone blue 1957 Plymouth that was parked nearby. Croy told the Warren Commission that after leaving 10th & Patton he drove by the Texas Theater (how convenient).

Capt. Westbrook returned to his office at police headquarters shortly after 2:00 PM. A few minutes later, before Capt. Fritz began to interrogate Oswald (circa 2:20 PM), someone told him that Oswald lived on N. Beckley. Who in the police department, other than Capt. Westbrook  (and Tippit, who was dead; and Croy, who was allegedly with his estranged wife), knew about HARVEY and LEE? Who knew HARVEY Oswald's address on N. Beckley at 2:00 PM and had immediate access to Capt. Fritz?  Capt. Westbrook.

Around 2:15 PM Sgt. Hill, assigned to the personnel office, brought the .38 revolver taken from HARVEY Oswald to Westbrook's office. The gun should have been taken immediately to Homicide and Robbery, but Hill brought the gun to the personnel office. Why? The murder weapon remained in Capt. Westbrook's personnel office for the next hour. The author believes that Capt. Westbrook secretly switched the revolver taken from HARVEY Oswald at the theater with the revolver used to murder Tippit (given to Westbrook by LEE Oswald). The .38 revolver used to murder Tippit was then initialed by police officers in Westbrook's office, entered into evidence, and turned over to the FBI later that evening. The .38 revolver, taken from HARVEY Oswald, and brought to Westbrook's office by Sgt. Hill, disappeared and was never seen again--thanks to Capt. Westbrook.

_____________________________________________________


POLICE ARRIVE AT 1026 N. BECKLEY
2:00 PM AT 1026 N. BECKLEY
(Testimony of Capt. J.W. Fritz)
Mr. Fritz. When I started to talk to this prisoner or maybe just before I started to talk to him, some officer told me outside of my office that he had a room on Beckley, I don't know who that officer was, I think we can find out, I have since I have talked to you this morning I have talked to Lieutenant Baker and he says I know maybe who that officer was, but I am not sure yet.
Mr. Ball. Some officer told you that he thought this man had a room on Beckley?
Mr. Fritz. Yes, sir.
(Testimony of A.C. Johnson)
Mr. Belin.  Do you remember about what time of the day they arrived?
Mr. Johnson. Well, it must have been around 1:30 or 2 o'clock---the best I remember.
Mr. Belin. When did you get home that day from your work?
Mr. Johnson. Well, it was around 1 o'clock or maybe a little bit after.
Mr. Belin. How long had you been at the house when the officers arrived?
Mr. Johnson. Oh, probably 30 minutes.
Mr. Belin. All right. What happened when the officers got there? They asked if Lee Harvey Oswald lived there?
Mr. Johnson. Yes.
(Testimony of Mrs. A.C. Johnson)
Mr. Ball. On the day of the 22d of November, were you home around 1 o'clock?
Mrs. Johnson. It must have been 1:30 or 2, something like that.
Mr. Ball. When you came home?
Mrs. Johnson. Yes; after serving lunch.
Mr. Ball. Did Earlene Roberts say anything to you whether or not this man had returned?
Mrs. Johnson. No; after these officers came in, well, then she began to-tell them that he did come rushing in....
(Testimony of Earlene Roberts)
The housekeeper, Mrs. Earlene Roberts, told the WC, "Well, it was Will Fritz' men---it was plainclothesmen and I was at the back doing something and Mr. Johnson answered the door and they identified themselves and then he called me. WC attorney Ball questioned Mrs. Roberts:

Mr. Ball. Do you remember the day the President was shot?
Mrs. Roberts. Yes; I remember it---who would forget that?
Mr. Ball. And the police officers came out there?
Mrs. Roberts. Yes, sir.
Mr. Ball. And they asked you if there was a man named Lee Oswald there?
Mrs. Roberts. Yes.
Mr. Ball. And you told them "No"?
Mrs. Roberts. Yes.
Mr. Ball. Then what happened after that?
Mrs. Roberts. Well, he was trying to make us understand that-I had two new men and they told me--Mrs. Johnson told me, "Go get your keys and let them see in." I had gone to the back and they still had the TV on, and they was broadcasting about Kennedy. Just as I unlocked the doors Fritz' men, two of them had walked in and she come running in and said, "Oh, Roberts, come here quick. This is this fellow Lee in this little room next to yours," and they flashed him on television, is how come us to know.
Mr. Ball. Then you knew it was the man?
Mrs. Roberts. Yes; and I come in there and she said, "Wait," and then again they flashed him back on and I said, "Yes, that's him--that's O. H. Lee
NOTE: As HARVEY Oswald was being paraded around Dallas police headquarters, and allowed to speak on camera, the planners had to feel that their plot was about to unravel. They quickly brought in Jack Ruby, as a last-ditch effort, to eliminate Oswald.  And which police officer likely provided Ruby access to the basement of police headquarters? At the top of the list is Kenneth Croy, as demonstrated by his testimony before the Warren Commission.
 
OSWALD'S ROOM IS SEARCHED
(Testimony of Mrs. A.C. Johnson)
Mr. Ball. Did you permit them to search his room? Did you look in the room while they were searching it.
Mrs. Johnson. I certainly did.' It had French doors to it; folding open, you couldn't help but see everything, the books and all they took out of these chests of drawers. They was throwin' them down on the bed.
Mr. Ball. Now, after these police officers came out of there, did you see a gun holster in his room after they had searched it?
Mrs. Roberts. Yes---there was one of them little outfits---a little holster and they taken it out and where they got it---I don't know, but it was in the room. They had it in their hands, one of the men was holding it.
3:00 PM--POLICE OFFICERS ARE SENT TO N. BECKLEY BY CAPT. FRITZ
(Testimony of Capt. J.W. Fritz) 
Mr. Ball. All right. Now, Captain, about what time did you first bring him to your office?
Mr. Fritz. Let's see, I have it right here. Oswald was arrested at 1:40 and I think he was taken to the city hall about 2:15 and I started talking to him probably a little bit after that.
Mr. Ball. About what time? Don't you have a time marked in your report there?
Mr. Fritz. I think so.
Mr. Ball. Of 2:25.
Mr. Fritz. 2:25.
(Testimony of Walter Eugene Potts)
Mr. Potts. ...my partner, Bill Senkel, and F. M. Turner--we work a three-man squad, and Bill came around and he talked to Captain Fritz, and he said "Come on, let's go. We are going out to 1026 North Beckley....Captain Fritz wants you and I to go out to Oswald's or Hidell's or Oswald's room."
Mr. Ball. Before you went out there, did you get a search warrant?
Mr. Potts. No; we didn't--we didn't get a search warrant at that time. We went to the location and talked to the people there.
Mr. Ball. That's Lt. E. L. Cunningham?
Mr. Potts. Yes, sir.
Mr. Ball. And who else?
Mr. Potts. B. L. Senkel.
Mr. Ball. And yourself?
Mr. Potts. And myself.
Mr. Ball. And you went out to where?
Mr. Potts. 1026 North Beckley.
Mr. Ball. What happened when you got there?
Mr. Potts. We got there and we talked to this Mrs.--I believe her name was Johnson.
Mr. Ball. Mrs. A. C. Johnson?
Mr. Potts. Mrs. Johnson and Mrs. Roberts.
Mr. Ball. Earlene Roberts?
Mr. Potts. Yes; and they didn't know a Lee Harvey Oswald or an Alex Hidell either one and they couldn't--they just didn't have any idea who we were talking about, so the television--it is a rooming house, and there was a television----
Mr. Ball. Did you check their registration books?
Mr. Potts. Yes, sir; we looked at the registration book--Senkel, I think, or Cunningham--well, we all looked through the registration book and there wasn't anyone by that name, and the television was afternoon. We got out there about 3.

(Testimony of Capt. J.W. Fritz)
Mr. Fritz. ...Officer Potts called me back from out there and talked to me on the telephone and gave me a report from out there on the telephone, and I am sure that that is the time that he told me about the way he was registered, and I asked Oswald about why he was registered under this other name.

(Testimony of F.M. Turner)
Mr. Turner. Well, when I walked in there (city hall), one of the lieutenants was talking about finding a justice of the peace to obtain a search warrant, and I told him that I just left the sheriff's office and one of the J.P.'s was down there when I left, David Johnston, and so he said, "Well, see if you can get ahold of him and get a warrant for this address on North Beckley and carry the warrant over there.
Mr. Belin. All right, what did you do there?
Mr. Turner. Well, Detective Moore was in the office. He and I got a car and drove down by the, back down to the sheriff's office, and when we got there, Judge Johnston and one of the assistant district attorneys, Bill Alexander, was standing on the front steps waiting for us, because someone got ahold of him by phone and told them I was on the way.
Mr. Belin. Was that Detective H.M. Moore?
Mr. Turner. Yes, sir.
Mr. Belin. Then what did you do?
Mr. Turner. We went on over, the four of us--me, Detective Moore, Judge Johnston, and Mr. Alexander--went over to 1026 North Beckley where this Lee Oswald had a room in it.
Mr. Belin. You went over there on November 22?
Mr. Turner. Yes, sir.
Mr. Belin. Now according to one record that I have of a search warrant, it is dated November 23. Do you have any particular knowledge whether the search warrant was actually dated November 22 or November 23?
Mr. Turner. I don't remember the date on it, but I know he had the warrant made out, and handed it to me when I got in the car, but I don't remember the date on the warrant.

(Testimony of David Johnston)
Mr. Johnston. I was first called to handle the issuance of the search warrant involving the residence at 1026 North Beckley ... if I can find the time I have written in here when it was flied. I would say it was around 5 o'clock in the afternoon when he asked me this search warrant was filed at 3:55 p.m. on November 22,
Mr. Hubert. Did you issue that search warrant?
Mr. Johnston. Yes; and not only did I issue the search warrant, I was requested by the officers to go with them and also Assistant District Attorney Bill Alexander was in on that search also, which turned out to be the room in which Lee Harvey Oswald had been living on North Beckley. I was present when that search was made and also seizure of the things that were in his room.

TURNER, MOORE, ALEXANDER, JOHNSTON ARRIVE AT 1026 N. BECKLEY

(Testimony of Walter Eugene Potts)
Mr. Potts. Well, F. M. Turner and H. M. Moore was with him, and Judge David Johnston was there, and also Assistant District Attorney Bill Alexander.
Mr. Ball. Did David L. Johnston go too, the justice of the peace?
Mr. Potts. Yes, the judge was there in person.
Mr. Ball. He was?
Mr. Potts. Yes; and also Assistant District Attorney Bill Alexander--they all came in the same car.
Mr. Potts....Senkel or Cunningham, one of them, called the office and they said that Turner was en route with a search warrant and we waited there until 4:30 or 5
Mr. Ball. What did you do then?
Mr. Potts. Well, after we showed Johnson the search warrant, I think it was Johnson, we went on in the room and continued to search the room, and we took everything in there that we could find.
Mr. Ball. Did you initial it right there in the room?
Mr. Potts. We initialed it after we brought it to the station.
Mr. Ball. These are the initials of the men who were there with you?
Mr. Potts. That's H. M. Moore and I guess it's F. M. Turner--"F. M. T."-that's my partner. Yes, sir; for the purpose of identification in court, we initialed everything we could possibly write on.

(Testimony of F.M. Turner)
Mr. Belin. Then what did you do?
Mr. Turner. We looked through this room and picked up everything in it that didn't belong with the house, you know.
Mr. Turner. We picked up all the articles and brought them to the homicide and robbery office of the city hall.
Mr. Belin. You made out an inventory of them there?
Mr. Turner. Yes, sir.

LEE OSWALD, STILL WEARING A WHITE T-SHIRT, WAS SEEN SOON AFTER HARVEY OSWALD'S ARREST

After seeing Oswald's photograph on television Mr. White contacted the FBI. He told FBI agent Charles Brown the man driving the car was (LEE) Oswald, and gave him the number of the license plate. The authorities soon determined the license plates were registered to a two-tone blue 1957 Plymouth that was owned by Tippit's best friend, Carl Mather, an employee of Collins Radio (a very important CIA contractor). So, LEE Oswald murdered Tippit and an hour later was driving a car owned by Tippit's best friend, Carl Mather. Wes Wise (later the Mayor of Dallas), accompanied by a CBS reporter, interviewed Carl and Barbara Mather over dinner. Barbara Mather was calm, but Carl Mather was so upset and agitated that he was unable to eat. Years later Carl Mather agreed to be interviewed by the HSCA, but not before insisting on a grant of immunity. Ken Porter, another employee of Collins Radio, quit his job after the assassination, divorced his wife, and married Oswald's widow--Marina.  In the FBI report relating to Mr. White's sighting of Oswald driving Carl Mather's car, the FBI changed the two-tone blue 1957 Plymouth to a red Ford Falcon. This allowed Carl Mather's wife, Barbara, to tell the FBI that they had never owned a red car.

The fate of HARVEY Oswald, in Dallas Police custody until he was killed by Jack Ruby, is well-known.  But LEE Oswald's whereabouts following the assassination became increasingly difficult to follow.  One intriguing account of his possible escape from the Dallas area comes from a  decorated U.S. Air Force 20-year veteran named Robert Vinson.  Vinson said that on the afternoon of November 22 he was a passenger on a nearly deserted C-54 cargo plane that departed from Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland. Soon after the assassination the plane was diverted and landed on what appeared to be a road under construction near the Trinity River south of Dallas.  There, Vinson said, a Jeep carrying two men and a driver pulled up to the plane and two passengers came aboard.  Vinson said the taller man might have been Cuban, and, after he saw televised pictures of Lee HARVEY Oswald, he felt the shorter man "looked an awful lot like Oswald."  The flight continued to an Air Force Base in Roswell, New Mexico, where all the passengers deplaned.  Vinson said he was told the entire base was on lockdown until later in the evening. Click here for Part 2 of the YouTube interview with Vinson.  Additional background information on Vinson is in Part 1 of the interview, also on YouTube.

Robert Vinson
Robert Vinson

NOVEMBER 23-24, 1963: THE FBI SOLVES THE CASE